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The Articles

  • The Analog Revolution

    · · 2 Comments

    Back in the day, when software was released (on physical media), it was considered done. In the present, some products could benefit from a limitation like that. To tie development to something immutable, such as a physical thing or a hard deadline, might just foster a sense of responsibility to design our product so it has what it takes to last a few years.

  • Using Responsive Images (Now)

    · · 29 Comments

    The rise of responsive web design sent designers and developers scrambling to figure out how best to deliver responsive images across a range of device widths. Thanks in large part to efforts by the Responsive Issues Community Group (RICG), we can now serve images of varying quality depending on the user’s viewport rather than on some convoluted server-side setup. Chen Hui Jing introduces us to the new image selection types and shows us how we can make them work for us.

  • Reclaiming Social: Content Strategy for Social Media

    · · 6 Comments

    When we talk about content, we mean all the content: words, pictures, videos, the whole shebang. And—surprise, surprise—that includes social media. Too often neglected or left to the mercy of Klout, social media accounts need the same care, strategic planning, and governance as the rest of your digital properties. Ida Aalen and Ida Jackson explain how content strategy is just the tool to dust off your accounts, regain control, and start producing better social media content today.

  • It’s Time We #FEDtalk

    · · 5 Comments

    One person focuses on HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Another writes JavaScript tests all day. And they both have the same job title: front-end developer. Mat Marquis talks about why that’s okay, and introduces our latest event, “The State of Front-End Dev”.

  • Writing to Think

    · · 13 Comments

    It's true, writing about your work can be tough. Putting your thoughts out there for everyone to see—and comment on—can be intimidating. But, as Susan Robertson shows, it's a great way to clarify your thinking on tough problems, and can lead to new opportunities in the process.

  • On Our Radar: Each Button, a Special Snowflake

    · · 2 Comments

    What grabbed our attention this week? We’re glad you asked. We’re digging the new design standards being shared by 18F and USDS; reading up on accessibility in design (and the notorious PDF!); learning to run better meetings; noodling around with responsive typefaces; and championing better ways to read the comments. Also, somebody likes raccoons. We think. We think that's what they meant.

  • How Do We Get It Done, Now?

    · · 3 Comments

    In the future that’s forever one short year away, brilliantly functional, widely implemented APIs will redeem us from our toil and trouble. We just have to get ready for their coming, while seeing to the nitty-gritty of making the web work in the present. Sadly, it's a lot less predictable than that. Every new standard has to start small, and we’ll always need to choose which API to back and which to pass over.

  • The Nearly-Headless CMS

    · · 7 Comments

    Decoupling your CMS can broaden your options for the presentation layer, let team members narrow their focus to what each does best, or provide data for iOS and Android applications along with a responsive site. Maybe the greatest benefit is that having to consider the relationship between the CMS and rendering layer helps break up assumptions about delivery formats, making you more future-friendly along the way. Mark Llobrera shares a couple of tales where headless was the right solution.

  • Privacy is UX

    · · 9 Comments

    Alex Schmidt argues that in a world full of security breaches, snooping, and third-party data aggregators, you should know where your users’ data goes. In this article, she explains why it’s time we make privacy part of our product design process—and helps us figure out how to build it into our requirements and skillsets.

  • Managing Your Content Management System

    · · 20 Comments

    Because every site has unique needs, no two content management systems should ever be alike. When implementing and customizing a new CMS, writes Rory Douglas, give your users only as much freedom as they need—but not enough to mess things up. They’ll love you for it.

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