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Susan Robertson

Accepting Our Lack of Control

· 2 Comments

Accepting the “ebb and flow of things” is as challenging today as it was 15 years ago. Susan Robertson explores what it means to accept our lack of control on the web and shares how she acknowledges this in her work—from the CSS she writes, to the conversations she has with team members. Read more

  • Coming May 6: Sass Talk

    by Sara Wachter-Boettcher · · 1 Comment

    To preprocess or not to preprocess? ALA: On Air will cover just that—live on May 6. Featuring Rachel Andrew, Lyza Danger Gardner, Jeff Lembeck, and Susan Robertson, “Sass Talk” will discuss when, how, and whether to use Sass, taskrunners, and other tools.

  • 15 Years of Dao

    by ALA Staff ·

    15 years have passed since we published John Allsopp's “A Dao of Web Design.” Join us as we take a look back at John's piece and consider what it means for the web today.

  • Designing Social Tools for Tweens

    by Debra Levin Gelman · · 4 Comments

    Kids these days. When they're not on our lawn, they're using the web in some pretty unique ways. Debra Levin Gelman encourages us to take their needs into account and offers a fresh new method to help us design social tools for kids ages 8–12.

  • On Our Radar: Self-Centered Edition

    by ALA Staff ·

    It's all about us this week at ALA. From steps to sleep to social activities, we're counting every kind of personal data you can think of. But what's all that data add up to? How could we look at it—and ourselves—differently? In this week's On Our Radar, we ask ourselves—and our self—the tough questions.

  • Don’t Forget About Contrast

    by Susan Robertson · · 7 Comments

    That old monitor you've got lying around? Time to put it to work. Susan Robertson reminds us of how important it is to test our designs on older screens and ensure the things we build work well for everyone.

  • On Our Radar: Present Tense

    by ALA Staff · · 1 Comment

    The future is here, for better or for worse—and this week, the ALA staff has been thinking about what that means: for our code (the impending arrival of HTTP/2), our content (publishing on Medium), and the cost of constant noise.

  • Brevity vs. Clarity

    by Anthony Colangelo · · 10 Comments

    Why did we all start using btn? Anthony Colangelo considers whether a lack of clarity is worth the benefits of brevity in our code.

  • On Our Radar: Communication Builds Community

    by ALA Staff ·

    This week, the ALA staff is thinking about color accessibility, the process of building a vocabulary, the current state of web typography, and the lessons we can learn from skater culture. In other words: it's all about inclusion.

  • 10 Years Ago in ALA: Attribute Anarchy

    by Mat Marquis · · 1 Comment

    A decade ago here in A List Apart, we published a radical article by Peter-Paul Koch arguing for custom attributes in markup. Today, Mat Marquis takes a look back at how times have changed, and shows how PPK’s idea has worked its way into the web.

  • Prioritizing Structure in Web Content Projects

    by Eileen Webb · · 9 Comments

    New content projects present a classic chicken-and-egg problem: should we start with the words, or focus on the structure they’ll take? There are benefits and challenges either way, but Eileen Webb has recently become a believer that starting with structure creates a better workflow for developers, designers and content creators alike.

The Latest Issue

Issue № 417 ·

  • Initiation to Code

    by Alice Mottola · 8 Comments

    The best person to mentor junior developers turns out to be: you. Mentoring can be a powerful tool for guiding and nurturing new hires, but it also benefits you—and your organization—by encouraging collaboration and curiosity in your everyday work. Alice Mottola offers guidance (and a little agile structure) for approaching the mentoring process—and shows how it can build better code and better engineers.

  • Let Links Be Links

    by Ross Penman · 16 Comments

    The notion of the web as an application platform has never been more popular. Single-page frameworks like Ember and Angular make it easy to create complex applications that offer richer, more robust experiences than traditional websites can. But this benefit comes at a cost. Ross Penman tells us what we can do about it.

Recent Columns

Lyza Danger Gardner on Building the Web Everywhere

WAI-finding with ARIA Landmark Roles

Between the intricacies of documentation and the risk of wielding too much power over the browser, WAI-ARIA can be daunting. For the dev uncertain on how to fold accessibility best practices into their daily workflow, Lyza Gardner sets out to summarize one category of roles—the landmark roles. They help user agents map out the territories on a page so the user can navigate them with greater ease, and they’re a great place to start getting familiar with ARIA’s part in assistive technology.

Laura Kalbag on Freelance Design

The Illusion of Free

The number of predictions that algorithms can make about us from even minimal data is shocking. Although we’re offered privacy settings that let us control who of our friends sees what, all our information and behavior tends to be fair game for behind-the-scenes tracking. We simply don’t know everything that’s being done with our data currently, and what companies might be able—and willing—to do with it in the future. Laura Kalbag believes it’s time to locate the exits.