A List Apart

Menu

A Blog Apart

Ten Years Ago in A List Apart: CSS Sprites – Image Slicing’s Kiss of Death

Rereading this seminal 2004 article from the comfort of today’s privileged position, it’s easy to miss how new and revolutionary Dave Shea's thinking was. Today we take sophisticated CSS for granted, and we expect our markup to be just that—clean and semantic, not oozing behavior and leaking layout. But in 2004, removing all that cruft from HTML took courage. And it was an act of absolute wizardry to conceive that a grid of images in a single master GIF or JPEG could replace all those http calls and subfolders full of tiny images thanks to CSS’s hover property and cropping ability.

We’re Nothing Without You: The Web at 25

The World Wide Web celebrates its 25th birthday with a newly launched website commissioned by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and designed and developed by A List Apart’s own creative director/designer Mike Pick and technical director Tim Murtaugh.

The Latest in Web Font Trends

Ever since @font-face was introduced, our web font choices have grown tremendously each year. Web font trend data can help us make sense of all those new choices—and give insight into which typefaces are working well on the web, and which might even be overused.

Read the Docs, Faster

As a developer, a large amount of my time is spent reading documentation. An even larger amount of time is spent finding said documentation. Or it was, until Dash entered my life.

Become a Better Public Speaker with Speaking.io

Public speaking is tough. You’re trying not to say “um” too much or speak too fast or crash your presentation or poop your pants or do any of the million horrible things that, in those first few minutes you’re up on stage, feel way too possible. Now there's a guide that makes it a little easier.

Discount Inquiries: When to Negotiate

How should you respond when potential customers ask for a discount before they've even tried your product? The folks at Close.io explain why negotiating may not be your best bet, and have a suggested response that might just do the trick.

Dive In: Resources for Web Animation

I'll admit it—animation is usually left until the very end of my design process. After nearly all of my other design decisions have been made, I'll look through the coded designs for opportunities to add some “flair.” What I loved about Val Head and Rachel Nabors' articles last week is that they advocated for a much more meaningful way to use animation. After reading their articles I immediately realized, “Wow, I should start thinking about animation way earlier.”