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  • Show Your Work: Demonstrating Progress on Your Projects

    by Eileen Webb · · 11 Comments

    I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how actual progress on a project doesn’t always match the impression of progress—sometimes a lot of code has changed but nothing looks very different, while other times a small change in code gives the sense that the whole project has moved leaps and bounds.

  • An Excellent Week

    by Tim Murtaugh · · 3 Comments

    A couple of big announcements are making the rounds this week: Google advises progressive enhancement and the W3C publishes an official HTML5 recommendation.

  • The Couch Cone of Silence

    by Mica McPheeters · · 7 Comments

    About five years ago, I bought a cushy couch for my office. (Okay, yes, I did get the model that could flatten into an emergency nap station, but let’s just say that I plan for contingencies—it sounds more professional that way.) Our projects required a lot of office-to-office visiting to discuss situations in person, and eventually, said couch (and therefore, my office) became a veritable beacon, attracting anyone looking for an excuse to decompress. Such is the life of a one-couch, 50-chair business.

  • Beyond You

    by Anthony Colangelo · · 1 Comment

    In client work, it’s our responsibility to ensure that our work lives beyond ourselves. Sometimes that means making sure the CMS can handle clients’ ever-changing business needs, or making sure it continually teaches its users. For clients with an internal development team that will be taking over after you, it means making sure the design system you create is flexible enough to handle changes, yet rigid enough to maintain consistency.

  • Learning to Be Flexible

    by Susan Robertson · · 6 Comments

    As a freelancer, I work in a lot of different code repos. Almost every team I work with has different ideas of how code should be organized, maintained, and structured. Now, I’m not here to start a battle about tabs versus spaces or alphabetical order of CSS properties versus organizing in terms of concerns (positioning styles, then element layout styles, then whatever else), because I’m honestly not attached to any one system anymore.

  • Personalizing Git with Aliases

    by Jeff Lembeck · · 3 Comments

    Part of getting comfortable with the command line is making it your own. Small customizations, shortcuts, and time saving techniques become second nature once you spend enough time fiddling around in your terminal. Since Git is my Version Control System of choice (due partially to its incredible popularity via GitHub), I like to spend lots of time optimizing my experience there.

  • Routines Aren’t the Enemy

    by Susan Robertson · · 1 Comment

    I recently read Greg Smith’s piece on Bocoup's blog about how they think about time tracking, including all the fascinating data about how your brain works to solve problems. It interested me a lot, since I've been thinking about not just how I track projects, but also how I structure my day as a freelancer.

  • Making Our Events More Inclusive For Those Under 21 (and Also Everyone Else)

    by Anna Debenham · · 16 Comments

    On Saturday, Benjamin Hollway, a 16 year old front-end developer, wrote a post about his recent experiences attending industry events. He’s been coding since he was eight, and earlier this year he was shortlisted for Netmag's Emerging Talent category. Yet none of the people in this category are able to participate fully in the sort of activities most of us take for granted.

  • Shellshock: A Bigger Threat than Heartbleed?

    by Tim Murtaugh · · 2 Comments

    A newly-discovered Linux flaw may be more pervasive, and more dangerous, than last spring’s Heartbleed.

  • It Was Just A Thing

    by Anthony Colangelo ·

    A little less than two months ago, I wrote about the most dangerous word in software development: just. A lot of assumptions hide behind that seemingly harmless word, but there’s another side to it.

The Latest Issue

Issue № 410 ·

  • Tweaking the Moral UI

    by Christina Wodtke · 119 Comments

    Even at the most welcoming and trusting of conferences, a code of conduct is a necessity. Codes of conduct let people know that organizers are willing to protect participants and solve problems—a way of improving the user experience for our whole community. Here, Christina Wodtke attests to the inclusive power of codes of conduct—and what we need to do to see them adopted across the industry.

  • Conference Proposals that Don’t Suck

    by Russ Unger · 2 Comments

    Conference proposals seem simple enough: throw your thoughts into a text form on a website, keep them within the suggested word limit, and hit send with high hopes of winning over organizers. But there’s much more to a successful conference proposal than meets the eye, and Russ Unger is here to walk through the steps involved with getting your germ of an idea into a polished state that will impress any committee.

Recent Columns

Lyza Danger Gardner on Building the Web Everywhere

The Implicit Contract

Working with a team of like-minded folks not only makes for more copacetic daily interactions, it actually has a positive effect on the end product. Developers are valued for more than their technical skills. Another hallmark of a good developer is how well they mesh with a team.

Rachel Andrew on the Business of Web Dev

The Ways We’ve Changed—and Stayed the Same

A perusal of the article titles in the seasonal magazine 24 ways shows how the things we’ve needed to learn and keep up with have changed since 2005. Amid all this change, one thing that remains evergreen is the generosity of web people in sharing their knowledge.