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  • Ten Years Ago in ALA: Dynamic Text Replacement

    by Yesenia Perez-Cruz · · 2 Comments

    Ten years ago this month in Issue 183, A List Apart published Stewart Rosenberger’s “Dynamic Text Replacement.” Stewart lamented text styling as a “dull headache of web design” with “only a handful of fonts that are universally available, and sophisticated graphical effects are next to impossible using only standard CSS and HTML.” To help ease these pains, Stewart presented a technique for styling typography by dynamically replacing text with an image.

  • Apple and Responsive Design

    by Anthony Colangelo · · 32 Comments

    Apple has always had a funny relationship with responsive design. They’ve only sparingly used media queries to make minor visual tweaks on important pages, like their current homepage. Though a “handcrafted for all devices” approach seems like the “Apple way,” it’s almost as if they’ve avoided it because of the iPhone’s original pitch—giving users the ability to pinch and zoom their way through the “full” web, as opposed to being shuttled off to the mobile web.

  • Testing Responsive Images

    by Mat Marquis · · 10 Comments

    At long last, the native picture element isn’t just coming: it’s here. The picture element has landed in Canary—Google’s “beta” channel for upcoming Chrome releases—and we can try it out for ourselves right now. Now, we need to test it out, look for bugs, and file issues.

  • On Styled Form Elements

    by Anthony Colangelo · · 12 Comments

    For almost 20 years, we’ve had the same input types and form elements we still use today: text fields and areas, password fields, select dropdowns, radio buttons, checkboxes, file fields, hidden fields, and the menagerie of button types including submit, reset, image, and plain old button.

  • We Have Work to Do: #yesallwomen and the Web

    by Sara Wachter-Boettcher · · 59 Comments

    Why does #yesallwomen matter for the web—and for A List Apart? Editor-in-chief Sara Wachter-Boettcher explains why making our industry a welcoming place for people of all kinds of backgrounds is the only way we’ll build the web we need.

  • Ten Years Ago in ALA: Art Direction and Drop Shadows

    by Mike Pick ·

    Ten years ago in May, A List Apart published Issues 180–182, featuring Art Direction and the Web by Stephen Hay and Onion Skinned Drop Shadows by Brian Williams.

  • Global Accessibility Awareness Day: Getting the Word Out

    by Andrew Kirkpatrick · · 1 Comment

    Today is Global Accessibility Awareness Day. To mark the day and promote the goal of the day, groups of developers and designers interested in accessibility offer webinars, presentations, and networking events to interest and educate more people about why accessibility is important and how to address accessibility in web content, documents, and software.

  • “Dear FCC,”

    Every voice counts! Please share your thoughts with the FCC before they vote later today to destroy net neutrality. This is an issue of justice and access. Save our shared web and help ensure that others can access it.

  • Design Tools for Today’s Web

    by Anthony Colangelo · · 23 Comments

    There’s no arguing that the Creative Suite applications are powerful, feature-rich, and have the intangible value of being industry standards, but as browsers became more advanced and rendering shifted from images to native CSS, the old, established applications fell out of step. The time was ripe for an application that was built, from the ground up, focused on the new era of interface design. And that’s when I found Sketch.

The Latest Issue

Issue № 410 ·

  • Tweaking the Moral UI

    by Christina Wodtke · 119 Comments

    Even at the most welcoming and trusting of conferences, a code of conduct is a necessity. Codes of conduct let people know that organizers are willing to protect participants and solve problems—a way of improving the user experience for our whole community. Here, Christina Wodtke attests to the inclusive power of codes of conduct—and what we need to do to see them adopted across the industry.

  • Conference Proposals that Don’t Suck

    by Russ Unger · 2 Comments

    Conference proposals seem simple enough: throw your thoughts into a text form on a website, keep them within the suggested word limit, and hit send with high hopes of winning over organizers. But there’s much more to a successful conference proposal than meets the eye, and Russ Unger is here to walk through the steps involved with getting your germ of an idea into a polished state that will impress any committee.

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