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10 Years Ago in ALA: Attribute Anarchy

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WARNING: there are experimental elements and deeply controversial syntaxes ahead! Proceed at your own peril! You have been warned, and the website you save…could be your own. Ten years ago, right here in ALA, a wild-eyed hell-raiser going by “PPK” made a radical proposal: custom attributes in markup.

In my opinion, using custom attributes to trigger the behavior layer … will help to separate behavior and structure and to write simple, efficient scripts.

Besides, triggers can grow to be more complicated than just a “deploy behavior here” command. Sometimes you’ll want to add a value to the trigger.

Well, okay. At the time it was radical. Here in the future, we have perfectly valid HTML5 data- attributes to contain all manner of information and act as behavioral triggers for our scripts.

The front end of a website consists of three layers. XHTML forms the structural layer, which contains structural, semantic markup and the content of the site. To this layer you can add a presentation layer (CSS) and a behavior layer (JavaScript) to make your website more beautiful and user-friendly. These three layers should remain strictly separate. For instance, it should be possible to rewrite the entire presentation layer without touching either the structural or the behavior layer.

All of this holds as true today as it did a decade ago. I know I’ve used data- attributes for both: to invoke custom behavior without touching the classes I use for styling—keeping my behavioral layers and presentation layers separate—and to pass relevant configuration information to said scripts. Picturefill 1’s data-srcset="1x source.jpg, 2x hd-source.jpg" comes to mind: we could define an attribute and write a script that dictates how the associated element should behave, all in one perfectly valid package.

The presence of the maxlength attribute alerts the script to check user input in this textarea, and it can find the maximum length of this specific textarea in the value of the attribute. As long as we’re at it we can port the “required” trigger to a custom attribute, too. required=“true”, for instance, though any value will do because this trigger just gives a general alert and doesn’t carry extra information.

maxlength? required? These custom attributes that once so daringly flew in the face of conventional web standards are now part of the HTML5 standard.

Maybe it’s best that the web didn’t linger too long on our warning at the top of the page.

 

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