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On Our Radar: The Empty Space That Is Not Empty

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“Being in tech and not caring about tech culture is a luxury, only affordable to those with enough privilege to ignore it and too little empathy to care.”

In her beautiful, award-nominated “A Talk About Nothing” at the 2015 .concat() web development conference, Lena Reinhard delivers a luminous exposition of how tech’s version of meritocracy is a brilliant system—for the people who get to define what merit is. When we overlook entire groups of people who could be making fantastic contributions to our future, we all end up with less. Don’t miss this talk. It’s full of stars. —Rose Weisburd, columns editor

Your weekend reading

  1. “Hold on a second. I’m like a two-out-of-ten on this. How strongly do you feel?” In The Sliding Scale of Giving a Fuck, Cap Watkins shares a useful framework for communicating how strongly you feel about a topic you’re debating with colleagues. I appreciate that it’s intuitive enough to use without explanation, and provides a way to engage on opposite sides of a subject without needless drama. —Aaron Parkening, project manager
  2. You may be intimately familiar with a typeface like VAG Rounded from (until recently) Apple keyboards. Or perhaps you’ve chosen a rounded sans like Process Type’s Bryant for a project. But how well do you know the history of these letterforms? FontShop’s Ferdinand Ulrich recently published the second part of his comprehensive survey of rounded type. (Part 1 appeared in March, and Part 3 is on the way.) —Caren Litherland, editor
  3. I’ve been doing some research into virtual reality (VR) and, although this is a few months old, I’ve just stumbled across it and wanted to share it. Mozilla has a team working on virtual reality and the open web. Their video presentation, Virtual Reality & The Web: Next Steps, is a fascinating introduction to how VR works, with demonstrations on how to build experiences for it using HTML and CSS. —Anna Debenham, technical editor
  4. “Progressive enhancement just works.” Aaron Gustafson compares two real case studies—one built to progressively enhance and another built to degrade gracefully—to show how progressive enhancement from the ground up can save considerable amounts of time and money for a project in the long run. —Michelle Kondou, developer
  5. I can’t say that I’m 100 percent sold on my own lifelong vegetarianism, but I like to think that it lends me a small amount of objectivity in hamburger-related matters. As such, I’m on the same side as the BBC when it comes to hamburger menus and their inscrutability for the average user: just because we designers and developers have a taste for them doesn’t mean they should always be on the menu. —Mat Marquis, technical editor

Overheard in ALA Slack

“What kind of bears are we talking about here, exactly? The article is light on the details.”

Your Friday Vine

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