Findings From the Web Design Survey

by ALA Staff

100 Reader Comments

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  1. I was fascinated at the dearth of women in the web design field. It might have been a statistical skew by who answered the survey (but the sample was very large which makes me think that there actually are so many more men in the field than women). I was looking for answers as to why web designers are so undervalued by clients (in the freelance world) and did not find my answers.

    I would love to also see a breakdown by skill set compared to fees/pay and even geographic comparisons to figure out what is appropriate to charge for a job.

    I love this magazine because it is beautifully presented and down to earth. Thanks for continuing.

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  2. Some of the comments in here are scary in terms of people viewing this as cold hard facts and not simply a snap shot of period of time with only the reach of this company. People need to understand that any ‘trends’ seen are ‘perceived’ trends which the survey very upfront states, and its based on user response not actually hard evidence say, job data from different agencies world wide. Having said that, this is an excellent piece as surveys go.

    @Ethnicity I agree with you, but only to a certain extent. America is actually where modern day racism – in terms of the brutality that was born out of it – began so of course there is relevance and import in showing those numbers, but this is way off topic so email me for a more in depth answer to that.

    What I will say to that end though is again you have to look at this as a snap shot of the time period and reach of the survey. I actually think you should throw out the ethnicity part of the survey, not because I don’t think it matters ( being a US-black myself I was all too keen to see the break down of the data:D ), but because the numbers are too low. 1.25 of 33k is roughly 400 people, which in most US state surveys is a low number, so then base that off a global survey and you can see that any comparison of those numbers to higher participants is vastly skewed. Good job white males for messing up the numbers :D.

    What I did find very interesting is the assertion that people with a perceived bias ( women for instance ) generally make more money than those that don’t, which to me means that there indeed is a bias and either those people work harder to achieve a goal and/or the employer recognizes the bias and is trying to compensate, squeaky wheel gets the oil sort of thing. So all of those that don’t perceive a bias might want to rethink their opinion! (tongue in cheek of course)

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  3. As soon as I see a question about ethnicity, I know it’s an American survey. Seriously, haven’t you learnt anything from your Civil War and Little Rock High, etc? You need to move on! This is an ongoing challenge for all of us, but America often seems intent on maintaining the distinction and then trying to pretend it doesn’t matter, when no-one else even asks.

    Conflicts over religious, cultural, “racial,” or national ethnic background do not occur only in the U.S. Last time I checked, tension between groups was taking place everywhere.

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  4. Sweet, nice, Thanks for raw data.

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  5. Thanks, it was fun and interesting to take the survey—and seeing the numbers is really helpful.

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  6. There is a question in the survey results that I can’t figure out. It is “Why did you turn it down?” Why did you turn what down? The question before it is about ethnicity slowing your career.
    Otherwise it’s a very interesting survey. I was very surprised at the results and the large number of people who responded.
    Must have been daunting compiling all that data.

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  7. Wonderful information – thank you!

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  8. America is actually where modern day racism — in terms of the brutality that was born out of it — began

    What?! Man, people have been killing each other over “race”—however you want to define that—for hundreds if not thousands of years. Modern day racism wasn’t born in America; modern day racism was born in ancient times.

    That said, I want to go on record as saying that as a black woman designer, it’s important to me to see numbers regarding minority representation in the field, and the reason is simple. Designers are culture creators, and I’m interested to know the gender and ethnicity of those who are sitting in the driver’s seat, so to speak. Growing up as a minority changes, to varying degrees, how we perceive the world as how it perceives us. (Granted, there are many things that contribute to this: ethnicity and gender are but two.) That perception bleeds into our work—or perhaps is our work.

    If only 1% of designers are black, that’s interesting and significant to me, if not from a design POV, then from an sociological POV. That data allows me to ask interesting questions: what other points of view are we not seeing? How does a monolithic point of view aid or impair our culture? In what other ways are these missing black would-be designers creating culture, or are they?

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  9. Is it just my machine, or were a lot of the graph tags blurred? I couldn’t read which line represented what.

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  10. I just wondered if you did any kind of feasibility or pilot study prior to releasing the questionnaire to the world? I know you’ve said you found problems with some of the questions so I assume not but I’d rather know for sure (as a student doing a research methods module…).

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  11. Good that these results are actually free for all to study and see. Kudos to whoever is invovled! :) Hoping something in future for the other side’s survey, ie. the users :)

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  12. It’s nice to see that the results are free for all to view analyze. Congrats to all behind the scene..:)

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  13. It’s really great that everyone may view the free results.  Thanks to all the people working behind ; )

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  14. Very interesting. I would like to see how happiness and money plot out. Also the bias section took up alot of space, what is the bias definition for each chart? it seems that many of the workers, designers-  make less than the managers. I am just learning web design, I am in the 50 plus age group, i want to be part of the exciting world of websites, I am taking classes, trying by doing and reading all I can. Designers should make alot more money. Thanks for the work and results.

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  15. Just stumbled on this. Props for putting it together and making it public (even the data)!

    I’d be curious to see if respondents report any education bias: Is not having a college degree, or too high a degree, a hindrance?

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  16. privet
    ggggg

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  17. I would love to see a survey to focus on some of the data regarding “Years at current job” and “Number of jobs held” and “Next Career Move”.  I would like to see this data to explain why such a high percentage of the development community has limited time at a single employer.  I would also love to see an employer/management survey focusing on the same data of why they feel designers tend to jump ship so often.  Does job stress, constant education, low pay, fierce competition, etc. have anything to do with the career choices?  How many web designers have gone from full time to part time and freelance?  How many developers feel burned out?

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  18. Wonderful information and a great presentation of the data. This survey is the only one I have seen like it. It’s good to know whats happening out there in the industry. Great job “A LIST apart”

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  19. like smoking cigarettes cause cancer. But many if not most cancers have nothing to do with how healthily you live your life or how many vegetables you eat or vitamins you take.

    Jeweler’s Tools

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  20. it’s just so shocking how homogenous the web industry work force is – in terms of race, gender and age. it’s really awful, shameful.

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