Around the World Wide Web in Eighty Minutes

by The W3C

6 Reader Comments

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  1. “It’s actually pretty simple…” This made me laugh, at my previous company the database did not support unicode which in essense made unicode practically impossible. Additionally all of the application logic was held in the database so switching databases was not considered a viable option. Unicode *support* was achieved by a series of code table translations and was extremely messy and hard to achieve. Developing right to left interfaces was easy by comparison!
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  2. The most interesting thing I’ve read on the web in a long time. Excellent article; thank you. Can’t wait for the next chapters!
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  3. Great article! Good to see i18n and L10n getting more coverage :)
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  4. Annotations above Japanese characters (or aside them, in case of vertical text) are actually called “furigana”. Ruby is just the term that has been assigned to the technical implementation of defining and displaying them.
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  5. @Martijn Apparently, the term ‘ruby’ actually derives from a named font size (5pt) used by (I believe British) printers. It’s useful in this context because it can be used for annotations in Japanese or Chinese. Btw, ‘furigana’ is typically used to refer to ruby with kana annotations.  There’s also a term ‘furikanji’ that is used to refer to ruby with kanji annotations. (See the glossary for the document Requirements for Japanese Text Layout.)
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  6. Excellent article - most informative. I will be adopting UTF-8 where possible in future (and now I even know why).
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