Everything in its Right Pace

by Hannah Donovan

15 Reader Comments

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  1. Great read and very thought provoking.  A great comparison is with writing a book report back in grade school.  When a teacher mandates a specific book, the number of complexities are immediately limited when compared to being given the option to pick your own novel (will it be the right length? Can I write a good report on this book? Is it an acceptable choice for this class?). 

    Defining a “box” is constraining, but it does allow you to focus more closely on the remaining options without excessive mental overload.

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  2. Information rushes at us all the time from many different mediums… 1000+ anyone?

    I gave up trying to “catch up” wondering if I missed something, feeling that if I wasn’t on top I would miss “the thing”. I now treat this torrent of information as just that – a fast moving river the I sit upon in a little boat. From time to time I simply dip my hand in and sample it. I see things that are interesting and worthy or further invitation or worthy of taking the time to enjoy. We just can no longer sit at the bottom of the waterfall and drink it all in.

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  3. @SBelyea Yes, it’s much easier to be creative inside constraints!

    @John Cox It’s a pure sanity as soon as you realise that, isn’t it? I started treating Twitter as a lossy medium about a year ago, and it started to become much more fun. And of course, it makes so much sense, because that’s exactly how we treat conversation. When we say good bye to friends and walk out of a cafe, we don’t concern ourselves about what chat we might be missing by not being there; we’ll see them again, some other time. The model that works for conversation doesn’t make sense for every product though ;-)

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  4. What a great, article! I love the idea of pacing and letting things sink in to find their value. A simple yet powerful observation (which, like you said, is actually being used by radio stations, for example, to get us used to things).

    Love the concept of This Is My Jam, btw. Will definitely try it.

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  5. The big problem today is finding the needle in the haystack.  Almost everything we see each day is either garbage or a restatement of something that has already been said before.  Turning off feeds is one of the most important things you will ever do.

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  6. thank you for this article very significant indeed our life passes quickly now than anything human life are shared through social networking sites blogs gap between people with people further away

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  7. I gave up trying to “catch up” wondering if I missed something, feeling that if I wasn’t on top I would miss “the thing”. I now treat this torrent of information as just that – a fast moving river the I sit upon in a little boat. From time to time I simply dip my hand in and sample it. I see things that are interesting and worthy or further invitation or worthy of taking the time to enjoy. We just can no longer sit at the bottom of the waterfall and drink it all in.

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.