Hellish Other People

by Cennydd Bowles

15 Reader Comments

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  1. Thanks for keeping a level head and writing a clear and constructive rebuttal relatively free of the “difficult” emotional reactions all of us “creatives” are feeling in response to Dr. C-P’s article.
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  2. Somewhat ironic that a lot of the comments under the article are “Childish, inaccurate, bizarre, and condescending” I think the author has played people and they’ve fallen for it.
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  3. Well said Cennydd.
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  4. How do you classify a “creative”?  Many times, it is the work or job that defines a person’s place in the organization not their personality.  Give a person a problem to solve in which they can be creative, they often become a difficult “creative” because they develop passion and drive to solve the problem.
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  5. Good rebuttal, but I would have ignored the article altogether.  Chamorro-Premuzic doesn’t deserve the attention.
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  6. My hat is off to you, sir. Absolutely brilliant writing.
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  7. “Creatives enjoy making simple things complex, rather than vice versa” Chamorro-Premuzic was referring to (among many other things) pointless pandering by outspoken creatives; exactly like this article. Hook line and sinker Bowles, how embarrassing for you. Let’s all get back to work children.
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  8. Thank you for writing this. Reminded me a bit of The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir.
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  9. Let it be said that _some_ creatives are, in fact, eccentric. Nevertheless, I think it is relevant that creatives (and respective bosses) attitude towards creative work will help avoiding stereotypes. Cennydd said creativity is a muscle, everyone has it; this is undeniable. So, creativity should be a group work, rather than single person setting standards for others (the Same) to follow, because “he’s the creative” (The Other). And this is a must in large companies with a large group of IT professionals.
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  10. Very well said. Unfortunately, there is a tendency in business talk to separate and segregate people according to different artificial categories. You pointed very well the case of “creatives” but it might as well be about the “entrepreneurs”, in this is case is exactly the opposite, the “entrepreneurs” are exceptional beings while the “others” are the lazy persons who are afraid to risk. Thank you for pointing this out.
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  11. “There is no Same and Other, no us and them; everyone has creative capacity”
    ...and yet there is a class of people who have arrogated themselves the word “creative” as their job title, and get irritated if you call them mere “designers” Chamorro-Premuzic’s view is widely held in the digital industry (I can’t speak for others). Perhaps instead of getting all touchy you should ask yourself “what have ‘creatives’ done to create that perception”. Just a thought.
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  12. Thank you for writing such an eloquent rebuttal on this. That HBS (emphasis on the BS) article made me seethingly angry. I refrained from a “petulant” response to it because I expect that is what the author was hoping for.  I try to imagine if the article had been about all MBAs being egocentric, misinformed idiots who should be dealt with accordingly. I’m sure the outcry would have generated much more national press.
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  13. I disagree. Some people are “aberrant”, but those people aren’t supposed “creatives”. It’s managers. The thing is, management is an “ordinary’ skill. Everyone has it. Your mother has it (I mean that in a good way, women are meant to be better managers), but the downside is that out of all the people being managed, the manager becomes the least skillful person of the lot. This is why there’s so much out there for managers to effectively belittle the people they manage. It makes them feel more important. No doubt some managers do this with the best intentions—they probably want to be the best manager they can be, and they apply empiricism to try and further their art. Others, however, are bound by the Peter principle: simply put there because they’re too useless to be anywhere else.
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  14. So… the original hbr article was a day late april fool’s joke right? I just can’t take it seriously, ha.
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  15. I know this article is older and perhaps less of a hot button now, but I did like one point in the original article: “3. Only involve them in meaningful work: Natural innovators tend to have more vision…” Otherwise that artice reenforces stereotypes and misconceptions held by marketing and creative professionals.
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