How Do You Go on Vacation?

by Rachel Andrew

7 Reader Comments

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  1. This is good stuff Rachel, but do you see application of the ideals outside of (bootstrapped/location-independent) entrepreneurship? What about for folks with 2-3 weeks of standard vacation? The standard work-life balance advice still doesn’t seem to help for most people.
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  2. I love this this advice - it’s so true. I’ve found use of an ultrabook, tethered to my HTC One on Three’s ‘all you can eat’ plan to be sparklingly liberating. Not only am I no longer bound to an office, I don’t even need to find WiFi. What’s more, the 3.5G mobile connection is often better than the rubbish WiFi that seems to be everywhere. I recently found myself doing a spot of catching up while waiting for the family at Legoland. Quite surreal, but a surprisingly productive stint. @Dave I get the traditional annual leave from my employers and while I’m off I process and triage email on my phone’s Gmail app. I can also be pinged on HipChat for a quick question or two. Far from being a stressor, this light communication with my team actually relaxes me. Makes me feel in control and more able to truly let go and take it easy.
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  3. Always encouraging and inspiring to see people pull this lifestyle off. It certainly requires a certain amount of discipline but I’m guessing the flexibility it allows is more than enough a reward, and turns out to be more liberating in the long run.
    @Charles Roper nice :)
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  4. The article is really well written and I like this different (more healthy?) view on working hours and holidays. I agree that the described solution is best suited for entrepreneurs, but I assume that this idea can be applied to other fields, as long as the work is primarily technology-dependent. The key factors for a successful adaptation are certainly employers, who are open to flexible working hours (if applicable at all) and (if technology-related) to use both the business and the private laptop/tablet/smartphone for work. However, most employers are not that open (yet; also for security reasons, although one can argue about this), so for now, I think this might be a privilege of entrepreneurs (and employees in start-ups).
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  5. I definitely agree that most every business owner has been responsible for (at some point in time) a varying amount of incidental customer support.  In extreme cases - some of us start our days understanding that a certain percentage of it will be consumed by resolving unscheduled challenges.  It seems, we either find ourselves in that position, or we place ourselves there. ^_^  Nevertheless, after personally having been the axle, on which the lifecycle of several businesses in the past have revolved around, I’ve come to a new approach regarding this notion. I truly love what I do and embrace diving into chaos every day, proactively approaching every obstacle and winning the never-ending battle against deadlines. I believe most of us enjoy doing so but, it does create the complex you identified so well.  When constantly being responsible, assuming unscheduled tasks, and driving profit through mild chaos, the whole paradigm boils down to overlooking of the need to occasionally review and enhance the structure and operation of our own business itself.  At least, in my case it was.  As business owners, our duty is to create, implement and maintain our organizations, the operational structure, and effective leadership. My passion has always been productivity and delivering the service intended rather than building the business itself.  Naturally, there are several arguments against the idealistic notion of creating and maintaining a perfect business; however, most will agree that regularly reviewing even the outer most layer of our businesses, in the name of efficiency, is crucial to success.  Unfortunately, too often we focus on fixing individual 3rd party faults and overlook the opportunity of enhancing our own platform. I still don’t really enjoy refactoring my own system of business but no chart or form of measurement can forecast the magnitude of the resulting yield from regularly doing so. ^_^  </ramble>  A business owner who associates their vacation to ‘running away’ might best be served using that vacation to analyze the trap their going back to.  Great post tho’!  This very issue got under my skin some time ago and still makes me twitch.
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  6. Now i am back to business after cool summer vacation.
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  7. I couldn’t agree more. When other business depend on you day-to-day, it’s important to keep them updated while you’re away, even if you can’t do any actual development.
    Lack of response to emails will only make your return to the office that much more painful, which will make you even more reluctant to take that needed vacation next time.
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