Improvising in the Boardroom

by Matt Griffin

5 Reader Comments

Back to the Article
  1. I’ve been using improvisation for years to make me more comfortable in facing fears. I never “study” for an interview anymore and feel like I pull them off much better.

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  2. IMHO, it is not improvisation, you made these events to a experience and knowledge driven workshop. And that is exactly the way which works best for me.

    In 90% of all cases, our potential clients have nothing but are more or less diffuse picture of the next project. There are goals and a strong hope that the things get done as they are expect them. With a prepared presentation, i’am caught up in slides and it is even harder to act flexible.

    But this is no way for people without a lot of experience and knowledge (i sometimes like to adress them as competence-simulators), so marketing people might get lost at this improvised track.

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  3. More often than not, when talking to clients, I’m pleasantly surprised at how smart and knowledgeable I am :-)) Really, it’s a sort of Zen thing. Once you make the experience that smart questions from well prepared clients lead to smart answers and a pleasant, interesting dialogue for both parts, you broke the spell that binds you. Some clients have no clue, which is second best, but then you get to lead the pitch—if you know your stuff, that’s ok. The problem are people who try to give you a hard time—happens occasionally, but surprisingly many people just want to get a job done, as you do. A notebook and internet or else, your past projects with a local web server are often quite enough to illustrate technicalities or give your clients ideas on how they like things to be done—or not, which is helpful, too.

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  4. a silly face with two hyphens and and a para ending with a dash resulted in a long, uncalled for strike through, maybe a sort of Zen thing, too.

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  5. Dude. THANK YOU.

    “[building sites] well is about listening. “Open your ears,” we used to say.”

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.