It Is What It Is

by Nishant Kothary

18 Reader Comments

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  1. Really, really insightful article -  helped me understand why some things drive me insane. Thank you. Looking forward to your future posts.
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  2. Thank you.
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  3. I recognize that I am the victim, apprentice and master all in one meeting. Is that odd? Great article. Already ordered Ariely’s book. Look forward to more of your writing.
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  4. Sitting back, grabbing a coffee. I am so very interested in where this ride takes us.
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  5. You know that feeling when you’re reading something and you’re so focused on it that all the background noise sounds softer and someone taps you on the shoulder and you don’t even feel it because its so interesting. Well thats what happened with this article when I read it. Couldn’t have said it better. Thanks!
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  6. Very helpful stuff. One thing I might add, in relation to all your bits about cognitive stuff, is to tread lightly. Sometimes it seems like we can go there and fail to see the importance of taking responsibility for ourselves and our actions and simply dismiss shortcomings as “science”.
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  7. As a (former) victim, now transitioning from apprentice to master I can only say big thanks for taking the time to share your insight all of us can relate to.
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  8. Holy hell, you nail 60% of my issues. Waiting for the next therapy session. ;-)
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  9. Great article! You had a great opening that fed into a lot of very important points. There were personal moments of defeat and finally of personal victory! This article for me came about in a moment of serendipity. You call it “clues from the Universe.” Without a lie, I was formulating a speech this morning about mind, body and brain, and I was focused on the amygdala. I was at Wikipedia researching about the amygdala and learnt that it is responsible for emotional and memory processing. It is not responsible for the flight-or-fight response, that is the role of epinephrine. I did not find any cross-references in the Wikipedia articles of amygdala and epinephrine. That said, your article touched upon what I think is a new era where we have so much information and knowledge at our fingertips (the Human Web) that if people don’t wake up now they are going to wake up one morning to a kind of culture shock! For those who are open to seeing the Universe (knowledge and creativity) will start seeing strange new coincidences and serendipitous acts. Yet, do not confuse Jungian synchronous events with the event, only play along. The synch may be a lie! Or is it? Maybe someone else can help us understand this strange evolutionary trait. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synchronicity#Criticisms You are on the right path, my friend. Keep it up.
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  10. My correction: the “amygdala hijack” says it all. :)
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  11. Thanks, all. @Brenden — Couldn’t agree more. I plan on writing about that. A rookie mistake of embracing this line of thinking is, “I can’t be wrong because I know the science. Hence, you must be.” @FuzzyBit — Yep, I was going to point you at some hijack resources. That said, you hint at a broader point: it’s tough to pinpoint what happens where when it comes to the brain. So many regions of the brain are involved in so many functions. Even with the fancy fMRI’s we have today, analyzing brain function is largely a mystery. At times it feels like analyzing life on earth while you’re sitting on the moon with nothing but a pair of binoculars. The amygdala (at least form everything I’ve read), originates the command to fight or flee, but most of it occurs due to the resultant chemistry in the limbic system. That said, the buck has to stop somewhere, and neuroscientists all seem to agree that that buck stops at the amygdala. Eagleman’s Incognito has some of the more fascinating stuff I’ve read about the amygdala of late. For instance, when the amygdala takes over, it numbs the neocortex (the part of the brain largely responsible for reasoning through emotional bursts). Brilliant design :)
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  12. I, too, held my fork (am eating lunch at my desk) while reading this article.  Eerily similar to my own experiences. Unfortunately, it took me a lot longer than Nishant to figure this out and I caused myself way too much pain.  Clipped to Evernote for re-reading.  Very much looking forward to more posts.
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  13. The universe heard my cries (Victim) and provided me with this column. I can’t wait to continue reading.
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  14. Great article, I really enjoyed it. Thanks for the insight!
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  15. I felt calmer and after reading this. Things fell into a perspective, a feeling that I can move forward with. I got up from my chair, into the next room and asked my dear friend to read it. A while later, he walks back into my room looks at me and simply nods his head acknowledging the same feeling I felt a few minutes back as we bump fists. We work together. “Lets become masters..” I say. Thank you for the honesty that came through this article, it means a lot.
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  16. The article gives a great insight into how the human mind functions. It’s so true that everyone can bear upto a certain limit only and after that they enter a defensive mode which may lead to violence and quarrels. This world would be so much better if only the people learned basic values like ‘compassion and tolerance’ accompanied by ‘anger management’! Sandra V.
    Bolee.com
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  17. I like how you talk about the theories we make up about everything, about how the brain thinks it decodes, when what it actually does is create. i like the idea of the three roles. Yet I think it’s fascinating how some people can get you mad in less than 30 seconds, while others are able to convince you to do things you don’t want to do, you shouldn’t do and sometimes said you won’t do in another 60.
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  18. When the implications of “it is what it is” leave me in a state of fearful dissonance,  I can recenter by simply remembering “I yam what I yam.”
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