Comments on Managing Ego

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  1. Great article and it is spot-on.
    And yes, the benefits of good relationships in the workplace are significant. I have seen a lot of poor managers and it is so painful to see how they can destroy people and companies. More people should read our article.

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  2. Thanks for this article, Brandon. I’ve loved your advice in this piece and the previous one.

    It’s funny. Although I am an overly sensitive (easily hurt) human being, I’ve long been a calm, confident client services professional. I understand that occasional client criticism, and even anger are not personal—they’re about wanting a solution that will truly solve their problem ... and anxiously knowing what the consequences will be if it doesn’t.

    This attitude has also done well for me when dealing with non-work-related feedback. Like, if my kid’s teacher tells me about a homework problem, I don’t get defensive; I understand we’re both tying to ensure my kid gets an education.

    My problem isn’t with clients so much as it is sometimes with colleagues, especially those I’ve worked with for a long time. It’s funny, but if I’ve worked with someone for years, they become family. And once someone is family, all my dysfunction kicks in. A client could yell at me (although none do) and I’d be serene as a Buddha. But if a trusted long-time colleague raises her voice, it freaks me out, and I respond as if I’m being attacked, instead of remembering that we’re both just anxious about solving a problem.

    I’ll take your advice to heart and practice it in my work life. Thank you again.

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  3. Great article Brandon, I believe maturity and experience can help in this matter also,thanks for posting your thoughts good read.

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  4. Great insights into navigating relationships in the workplace. I can reflect on many situations where these tools would have benefitted everyone in working out seemingly small conflicts that became a larger issues b/c no one anticipated the unspoken fears and anxieties held by each other. Definitely adding this to my interpersonal toolbox! Thanks, Brandon!

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  5. This a great article, and a timely reminder to examine my own insecurities as I interact with clients (as well as to be mindful of their insecurities!). I find myself constantly needing to remind myself that the person on the other side of the phone/computer/table has their own demons, struggles, and stresses, just like I do.

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  6. Great article, thank you.

    It’s been helpful to research a team members real area of expertise and interests (read their linkedIn, Twitter, website) with an eye to finding their strengths rather than focusing on how poorly their job title fits their experience.

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  7. This was an insightful article.  With the greatest of respect to my clients I find that treating them with the same respect and deference I give my kids usually means they get listened to, they feel they have been heard and a middle ground is reached.  In 15 years of web development I’ve only met one or two genuinely horrendous people who are just out to cause trouble.  I think this article perfectly captures that everyone is just out to do their job and in most (not all, but most) cases people just want to do the best job they can for themselves, their boss or/and the cosmos.

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