Using XHTML/CSS for an Effective SEO Campaign

by Brandon Olejniczak

62 Reader Comments

Back to the Article
  1. Thanks for the article. Other than the grandma comment, which was rude, the article was brief but helpful. I’ve been doing SEM for years but haven’t had the opportunity to build a pure CSS-driven site yet. I’m looking forward to it, and if I need a little ammunition to convince others that it’s worthwhile, this article may help a little bit.

    By the way, my grandmother at 81 is making lovely use of the web.

    Cheers,
    Gradiva

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  2. Can’t believe you’d call your grandmother “dimwitted.” That’s just mean.

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  3. It’s interesting that the article doesn’t mention the (X)HTML code structure itself. For example, with the magic of CSS, I can have a left menu that actually gets coded on the page /after/ the main content, so even though my menu is entirely text-based, contains H1 tags, etc, when google spiders my page, it’ll use the beginning text – which is actually content – as the small summary in its results.

    Example -> http://quotes.prolix.nu/

    This site uses a tweaked version of the blue robot CSS code. Good stuff.

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  4. Hi, i’m new to CSS layout. After 6 years of mucking up HTML, i discovered this method really recently, after being struck by espn’s site.
    Not seeing any tables was a shock. This article gave me a lot of simple pieces of advice. I will source it when i try to convince the management to switch to CSS layout for our clients.

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  5. let’s say i don’t want to use a h1 tag, just an image? is there a way so that i still reveive good search egine results? thx

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  6. Another potential benefit for SEO of CSS design is the ability to position content in the hierarchy of the HTML in order to have the most important (keyword-rich) content at the top.

    Example: the chairman wants his 500-word mission statement appear at the top of the page, with product information below it. CSS-P saves the day by allowing us to position the content that the search engines require at the top of the HTML and yet display the chairman’s waffle at the top of the displayed content.

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  7. After reading the article I thought that it is time to put it to the test. I proposed to my marketing team to implement across Europe and see what results we get. Will provide feedback on rankings in 1 months time.

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  8. In general terms, I’d say that the article is right, but I think that any designer hoping that his/her rankings will get a boost only because of the code/content ratio is in for some nasty surprises. It’s really one of the ranking factors, but is not by far one of the most importants.

    And, of course, it’s not necessary for a web to be in XHTML+CSS to achieve that ratio, old HTML+CSS will do fine, but I agree, it’s good that these good practices gets rooted in he XHTML way of coding.

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  9. You can get a good placement without using a h1, but images has nothing to do with your placement ;)

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  10. You called your grandmother completely dimwitted—enough said!

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  11. Googlebot happens to love well marked-up websites + Googlebot loves a good code to content ratio.

    XHTML / CSS offers you both.

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.
  12. I honestly think that the amount of code does not matter as long as the site is quick loading, and has at least some amount of content to be indexed (or sufficient link popularity to not need to worry about on the page factors.)

    Copy & paste the code below to embed this comment.