Using Embeddable Getty Images

by Anthony Colangelo

11 Reader Comments

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  1. The non-commercial usage will be a barrier for many potential sites to use. Loved you pointed out about being dependent on their CDN – great point. The lack of responsive image sizing is certainly a large drawback as well.

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  2. Anthony, with iframe injections not only can you distribute malware, but you can redirect visitors to a whole new website, infected website most likely. Which brings up another SEO issue of getting blacklisted.

    FYI.

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  3. I’m with Anthony here, I see security issues all over this.

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  4. I could see the use of this, not for the core images that make up part of the design of a website, but for images that form part of a story or article, and go in between body paragraphs. The images would probably be chosen by authors and editors rather than designers.

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  5. Is there a reason why we should be concerned specifically about Getty’s CDN and use of iframes? Were they ever hacked and actually did damage that I’m not aware of? I understand the general concern that is always present when they are used, but unless they have a history of poor security I feel like this article seems like it’s trying to scare people over things that are fairly common.

    CDN’s are used all the time by major sites. It’s fairly common to use them. Heck, many people will load common JavaScript libraries from Google’s servers. Same with jQuery’s servers. They’re a means to cut down on load time.

    YouTube videos and Google Maps are commonly embedded using an iframe. Should we stop posting videos and maps on our sites out of security concerns?

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  6. I think it’s a great move by getty in terms of monetizing their images but I just think that it looks so ugly and really unprofessional, there’s no way that I would feel comfortable using the embedded images on a website linked to a commercial product or service.

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  7. Thank you for this article.  I think this is a great option for bloggers who are occasionally looking for images to enhance their posts.  I wrote a post this week on how to add the images into WordPress: http://www.eileenlonergan.com/whats-new-free-with-images-for-your-website. If someone is looking for a great place for images that don’t require an attribute check out Unsplash by Ooomf.

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  8. I forked your CodePen with a potential solution for a css only responsive layout.  It’s not prefect, but might help someone.  One problem I have noticed is Getty has some javascript resizing the image inside the iframe if you’ve set the iframe to width: 100% in css.  Very annoying, just let it be responsive by nature, no?

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  9. Its so nice work like it..

    web design services

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  10. As a blogger and web designer, I wouldn’t want to have iframes embedded in my posts and designs. Personally, I prefer Creative Commons CC0 images, which don’t require attribution. My first choice for such is usually Pixabay.com …

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  11. I agree with Simon about the the iFrame. Also the fact that they’ve left a footer there, to me, indicates pretty clearly that they intend to ad advertisements once their api has garnered a wide enough adoption by content producers.

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