W3C in the Wild

by The W3C

7 Reader Comments

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  1. Ironically, none of the videos mentioned in the article are accessible for hundreds millions of deaf and hard of hearing people – would you please provide good quality captions and transcripts for all of them? Tim Berners Lee said that users with disabilities are not to be excluded: “The power of the Web is in its universality. Access by everyone regardless of disability is an essential aspect.” Thanks!

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  2. For more details, please read my website on www.audio-accessibility.com about why captioning is universal access.

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  3. Hi, Sveta, thanks for bringing this to our attention. If I recall correctly, all the archived videos were transcribed originally. Something may have happened when we moved the videos from our streaming host to W3C’s servers. We certainly believe in transcribing video, not only for accessibility, but also for searching, indexing, and other benefits. We’ll try to figure out what happened, and correct it as soon as possible. Thanks!

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  4. Thank you both!

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  5. Thanks Zveta!

    Cheers! Jaime

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  6. Shepazu – I agree with you about other benefits of captioning – that’s why I said that it is universal access. And thank you for taking this issue seriously.

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  7. Captioning would not only help people who are deaf or hard of hearing. It could be very helpful for second language speakers, or those who have to view videos on inexpensive equipment or a cubicle at the office.
    There are millions on this planet who don’t have access to the latest equipment and internet at home.

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