Welcome to Slashdot
  • Linux
  • News
  • Data Storage
  • Software
  • Music

Slashdot Login



[ Create a new account ]

Slashdot Poll

Best Karaoke Song?

  • Yes.
  • No.
  • !
  • Worst Poll Ever.
  • No, there's been a worse one.
  • No, there hasn't.
  • Yes, there has.
  • No! Yes! No!
[ Results | Polls ] Comments:1028 | Votes:70248

Book Reviews

Need something to read? Slashdot's book review section is full of reader-submitted reviews of books you should know about.

  • Matt Solnit reviews Dan Appleman's e-book Hijacking .NET, a short but "eye-opening look at how you can use undocumented and private features from the .NET framework."
  • Michael Palmer reviews the O'reilly-published HTTP: The Definitive Guide , " a good overview of HTTP and many related topics."
  • Tony Williams reviews Rael Dornfest and Kevin Hemenway's OS X Hacks, a "good grab bag of tips and techniques for getting the most from your Mac."
  • Max Tardiveau reviews author/publisher Wall Street Meat which follows author Andy Kessler's path "from starting as a junior stock analyst at Paine Webber, to becoming a well-known technology analyst, to leaving Wall Street and going off on his own."
  • iConrad reviews Mark and Daniel Ratner's Nanotechnology: A Gentle Introduction to the Next Big Idea, which explores the theory, history and ethics of nanotech, but doesn't shy away from describing where the money is.

Add your name to this list! Submitting your own review for consideration is easy. Just read the Slashdot book review guidelines, and then use the web submission form.

Updated: 20030522 01:55 by timothy

Quick Links

Cool Sites:

Support Slashdot:

SCO Extorting Unixware Licenses to Linux Users?

Posted by CmdrTaco on Tuesday July 22, @10:28AM


from the but-i-don't-want-unixware dept.

An anonymous user noted that SCO will sell you Unixware if you want to "Legitimize" your usage of Linux at your company. If you buy the license, you will be held blameless for your transgressions against SCO! Pricing has yet to be determined for the special licenses, but I suspect that for any value greater than zero, there are going to be a fair number of angry users.

( Read More... | 100 of 147 comments )

Whatever Happened to Micropayments?

Posted by CmdrTaco on Tuesday July 22, @09:47AM

from the are-we-there-yet dept.


prostoalex writes "Remember Flooz? Or Beenz? With a few notable successes (PayPal, and that's about it) online micropayment industry is saving its success stories for future generations. New York Times reports about two nascent micropayment systems, one coming out of Stanford, one out of MIT, that are supposed to help the content producers and Internet users to engage in less-than-a-dollar financial transactions without huge overhead costs, so typical of credit card payments. BitPass requires you to purchase a virtual debit card with a certain amount on it to pay for products and services, and PepperCoin consolidates numerous micropayments into one bill that is then split between the content providers that managed to sell their product to the Internet user." I still believe that single penny transactions will revolutionize the net.

( Read More... | 100 of 147 comments )

Do It Yourself CD Changer

Posted by CmdrTaco on Tuesday July 22, @08:51AM

from the surprisingly-elegant dept.

Data Storage

SuperDuG writes "This is a true homebrew solution to saving a few bucks when it comes to cd changers. And to make it even better the whole setup is controlled by none other than linux. Seems like a nice setup to do batch burns without user interaction. Source is provided if you wanted to build your own." Not sure if this is very practical, or even if it would be cheaper than buying a changer, but it sure looks cool.

( Read More... | 78 of 118 comments )

Your Rights Online: How SCO Helped Linux Go Enterprise

Posted by timothy on Tuesday July 22, @08:04AM

from the giveth-and-taketh-away dept.


An anonymous reader submits: "SCO may now have filed for UNIX copyrights and made various allegations about code-copying, but the actual complaint against IBM still seems to be focused around allegations UNIX-based enterprise technologies (such as RCU, JFS and SMP) being improperly added to Linux. Yet, reviewing the Linux kernel archives reveals some interesting and surprising background on just who helped put these technologies into Linux. PJ's GROKLAW blog has uncovered that ' Caldera Employee Was Key Linux Kernel Contributor,' including what looks like a lot of work on the early stages of JFS. The same employee's name also crops up when we look at RCU. When IBM posts RCU improvements, did he complain? No, he requests further improvements even helpfully providing a link to inspire the IBMer!"

( Read More... | 765 bytes in body | 175 of 228 comments | yro.slashdot.org )

Ask Slashdot: Getting Software Added to Unix Distributions?

Posted by Cliff on Tuesday July 22, @07:18AM

from the lobbying-for-inclusion dept.


suso asks: "I've been working on a set of programs called num-utils that I would eventually like to be considered for inclusion in some of the many free Un*x distributions (on the install CDs, etc). So my question is, how does one put their applications on the track to be included in the main distribution of Red Hat, Debian, SuSE, *BSD, and so on? Is this just something that is up to the maintainers or are there submission forms of some kind?"

( Read More... | 114 of 153 comments | ask.slashdot.org )

MIT Students' Audiopad Mixes Electronic Music

Posted by timothy on Tuesday July 22, @04:53AM

from the cool-videos dept.


nicodemus05 writes "Grad students at MIT's Media Lab have come up with an innovative control device called the Audiopad to run their digital music studio. The Audiopad, '...is a composition and performance instrument for electronic music which tracks the positions of objects on a tabletop surface and converts their motion into music.' It's practical, but more importantly it looks really, really cool."

( Read More... | 60 of 92 comments )

Embarrassing Governments Into Adopting Open Source

Posted by timothy on Tuesday July 22, @01:33AM

from the don't-worry-they'll-print-more-money dept.


caitsith01 writes "An effort is currently underway to embarrass the Australian Federal Government into adopting open source software. As this story explains, the Australian Democrats have put questions on notice in Parliament that will require all government ministers to disclose how much money their departments spend on Microsoft products each year. The idea is to force open source issues to the fore by showing just how much money Microsoft receives from the government. It could be a smart approach - the average taxpayer knows little or nothing about OSS, but will rapidly form and express vocal opinions about the government wasting money. The article also mentions that a bill may be introduced to Federal Parliament to mandate the consideration of open source solutions (you may remember this story about an Australian state trying to introduce similar legislation). Some quotes from the article: "What the country doesn't need is to be tied into a profit-maximising licensing system, and the way to combat that is to get government to break out of the paradigm." On the other hand, the (right wing) Liberal Party criticises suggestions that use of open source should be compulsory as "hi-tech affirmative action.""

( Read More... | 250 of 348 comments )

Ask Slashdot: Color Printing Without the Inkjet Mess?

Posted by timothy on Monday July 21, @10:49PM

from the pick-any-two dept.


Above writes "Many recent stories have been about the problems of inkjet Printers. Seems they all want to sell the printer for cheap, and then use the ink to make up the difference. There are also problems where a lack of printing, or printing too much, could make it much more expensive to use your inkjet. So, since mine just died, what are the best options? I'm intersted in two catagories, a 'personal' color printer, probably USB to a machine, and a 'workgroup' color printer, with ethernet, postscript prefered. While Windows is good for my application, something that plays well with FreeBSD and Linux would be a major win as well. I'd consider laser if it's cheap enough (read $500/printer), and I don't think that it is. I'm willing to pay a bit more for the printer if that means bigger ink tanks, better cleaning, and easier to buy replacement supplies, the question is, are there really good options out there or have the low-end 'throwaway' printers taken over the market?" One option is a modded inkjet like the ones here, liberated from tiny ink cartridges. Any recommendations out there for decent color lasers?

( Read More... | 286 of 360 comments | ask.slashdot.org )

DVD Player With DVI Output

Posted by timothy on Monday July 21, @09:47PM

from the firewire-would-be-nice-too dept.


ffierling writes "Why are there no big name DVD Players with digital video outputs? With all the available digital displays (LCD, plasma, DLP, etc) and the obvious benefits of an all-digital connection, it's easy to conclude the threat of litigation from copyright holders is holding up the big name manufacturers. So how is it V Inc. can sell their Bravo D1 DVD Player with DVI output? Are they below the MPAA's radar, or just quicker to market?"

( Read More... | 196 of 285 comments )

Developers: Qt On DirectFB

Posted by timothy on Monday July 21, @08:22PM

from the jumping-a-layer dept.


Ashcrow writes "The feasibility for DirectFB to replace XFree86 just a little stronger thanks Maurizio Monge very first alpha release of Trolltech's Qt library for use in DirectFB. You can check out some screenshots or go straight to the source. And yes, it has been released as Free Software."

( Read More... | 242 of 344 comments | developers.slashdot.org )

[ home | awards | contribute story | older articles | OSDN | advertise | self serve ad system | about | terms of service | privacy | faq ]