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Issue № 292

Triple issue on UX and search. Get rational with search site analytics. Test search for relevancy and precision. Join our search party!

Internal Site Search Analysis: Simple, Effective, Life Altering!

by Avinash Kaushik · 7 Comments

Your search and clickstream data is missing a key ingredient: customer intent. You have all the clicks, the pages people viewed, and where they bailed, but not why they came to the site. Your internal site-search data contains that missing ingredient: intent. Learn five ways to analyze your internal site-search data, data that's easy to get, to understand, and to act on.

Testing Search for Relevancy and Precision

by John Ferrara · 10 Comments

Despite the fact that site search often receives the most traffic, it’s also the place where the user experience designer bears the least influence. Few tools exist to appraise the quality of the search experience, much less strategize ways to improve it. But relevancy testing and precision testing offer hope. These are two tools you can use to analyze and improve the search user experience.

Beyond Goals: Site Search Analytics from the Bottom Up

by Lou Rosenfeld · 8 Comments

Top-down analytics are great for creating measurable goals you can use to benchmark and evaluate the performance of your content and designs. But bottom-up analysis teaches you something new and unexpected about your customers, something goal-driven analysis can't show you. Discover the kinds of information users want, and identify your site's most urgent mistakes.

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