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Issue № 295

Stop bewildering them with babble: communicate the business value of UX research to clients. Beyond keywords and killer headlines: make your rich content sites learner-friendly.

Can You Say That in English? Explaining UX Research to Clients

by David Sherwin4 Comments

It's hard for clients to understand the true value of user experience research. As much as you'd like to tell your clients to go read The Elements of User Experience and call you back when they're done, that won't cut it in a professional services environment. David Sherwin creates a cheat sheet to help you pitch UX research using plain, client-friendly language that focuses on the business value of each exercise.

You Can Get There From Here: Websites for Learners

by Amber Simmons24 Comments

"Content-rich" is not enough. Most websites are not learner-friendly. As an industry, we haven't done our best to make our content-rich websites suitable for learning and exploration. Learners require more from us than keywords and killer headlines. They need an environment that is narrative, interactive, and discoverable. Amber Simmons tells how to begin creating rich content sites that invite and repay exploration and discovery.

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