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Issue № 326

Liberate your content to get ahead of the curve in 21st century publishing. And empower live audiences with backchannel wizardry.

Orbital Content

by Cameron Koczon · 36 Comments

Bookmarklet apps like Instapaper and Readability point to a future where content is no longer stuck in websites, but floats in orbit around users. And we’re halfway there. Content shifting lets a user take content from one context (e.g. your website) to another (e.g. Instapaper). Before content can be shifted, it must be correctly identified, uprooted from its source, and tied to a user. But content shifting, as powerful as it is, is only the beginning. Discover what’s possible when content is liberated.

Conversation is the New Attention

by Timothy Meaney, Christopher Fahey · 14 Comments

Baby's got backchannel! If everybody at the conference is staring at their Twitter stream instead of at the person who's doing the speaking, maybe the speaker should meet them halfway. Migrating speaker presentations to the backchannel can empower the audience while enabling the speaker to listen carefully to their responses. The broadcast model of presentations is dead! Long live the conversation model.

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From the Blog

Learning to Be Flexible

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Personalizing Git with Aliases

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