A List Apart

Issue № 367

Why Apple’s newest tablet sets a tricky precedent for folks designing flexible, multi-device experiences.

Vexing Viewports

by Lyza Danger Gardner, Stephanie Rieger, Luke Wroblewski, Peter-Paul Koch · 44 Comments

Each week, new devices appear with varying screen sizes, pixel densities, input types, and more. As developers and designers, we agree to use standards to mark up, style, and program what we create. Browser makers in turn agree to support those standards and set defaults appropriately, so we can hold up our end of the deal. This agreement has never been more important. That’s why it hurts when a device or browser maker does something that goes against our agreement—especially when they’re a very visible and trusted friend of the web like Apple. Peter-Paul Koch, Lyza Danger Gardner, Luke Wroblewski, and Stephanie Rieger explain why Apple’s newest tablet, the iPad Mini, creates a vexing situation for people who are trying to do the right thing and build flexible, multi-device experiences.

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