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Topic: Accessibility

  • Web Accessibility and UK Law: Telling It Like It Is

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    There’s been widespread speculation about the new legislation being introduced in the UK, which is intended to ensure that websites are accessible to people with disabilities. This article examines how these new laws will affect the way you design in the real world.

  • Power To The People: Relative Font Sizes

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    Relative font sizes may make websites more accessible — but they’re not much help unless the person using the site can find a way to actually change text size. Return control to your audience using this simple, drop-in solution.

  • Accessible Pop-up Links

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    Sometimes we have to use pop-ups — so we might as well do them right. This article will show you how to make them more accessible and reliable while simplifying their implementation.

  • Retooling Slashdot with Web Standards Part II

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    In Part I, we showed how Slashdot could save money and reduce bandwidth requirements by converting to semantic XHTML markup and CSS layout. In Part II, we explore how standards-compliant markup and deft use of CSS could make Slashdot and your sites play nicely in print and on handheld devices.

  • Retooling Slashdot with Web Standards

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    A look at the markup behind Slashdot.org demonstrates how simple and cost-effective the switch to a standards-compliant Slashdot could be. (Part I of a two-part series.)

  • How to Save Web Accessibility from Itself

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    An upcoming revision to the Web Accessibility Guidelines is in danger of becoming unrealistically divorced from real-world web development, yielding guidelines that are at once too vague and too specific. Your expertise and input can help create realistic guidelines that work.

  • Suckerfish Dropdowns

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    Teach your smart little menus to do the DHTML dropdown dance without sacrificing semantics, accessibility, or standards compliance or writing clunky code.

  • Facts and Opinion About Fahrner Image Replacement

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    Fahrner Image Replacement and its analogues aim to combine the benefits of high design with the requirements of accessibility. But how well do these methods really work? Accessibility expert Joe Clark digs up much-needed empirical data on how FIR works (and doesn’t) in leading screen readers.

  • Accesskeys: Unlocking Hidden Navigation

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    Your favorite applications have shortcut keys. So can your site, thanks to the XHTML accesskey attribute. Accesskeys make sites more accessible for people who cannot use a mouse. Unfortunately, almost no designer uses accesskeys, because, unless they View Source, most visitors can’t tell that you’ve put these nifty navigational shortcuts to work on your site. In this issue, Stuart Robertson unlocks the secret of providing visible accesskey shortcuts.

  • Flash MX: Moving Toward Accessible Rich Media

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    Andrew Kirkpatrick of the CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media tackles Flash MX from the developer’s perspective, showing how authors can more easily generate accessible Flash content, and where roadblocks remain.

  • Flash MX: Clarifying the Concept

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    In a detailed survey, accessibility obsessive Joe Clark evaluates Flash MX (authoring tool and player) in the context of the often confusing WAI and Section 508 guidelines, finds some things to cheer about, and draws a roadmap for future improvements.

  • Accessibility, Web Standards, and Authoring Tools

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    With the advent of more compliant web browsers, the quest for standards shifts to the tools pros use to build sites. Christopher Schmitt spoke with Adobe and Macromedia for the low-down on web standards, accessibility, and authoring tools.

  • A Backward Compatible Style Switcher

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    You asked for it, you’ve got it: an Open Source alternate style sheet switcher that actually works in Netscape 4. No, really. Daniel Ludwin shows how it’s done.

  • Why Don’t You Code for Netscape?

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    Long considered the Holy Grail of web design, “backward compatibility” has its place; but at this point in web development history, shouldn’t we be more concerned about forward compatibility? ALA makes the case for authoring to web standards instead of browser quirks.

  • All the Access Money Can Buy

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    Just when you think online multimedia will never be truly access, someone proves you wrong. In BMW Films, Clark sees a tantalizing glimpse of a better web.

  • CSS Talking Points: Selling Clients on Web Standards

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    Selling your clients on standards-compliant design doesn’t have to hurt. Kise’s four-point CSS Selling Plan helps the medicine go down.

  • SMIL When You Play That

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    A gentle introduction to the SVG and SMIL standards for programmable vector graphics and accessible rich media.

  • From Table Hacks to CSS Layout: A Web Designer’s Journey

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    Redesigning A List Apart using CSS should have been easy. It wasn’t. The first problem was understanding how CSS actually works. The second was getting it to work in standards-compliant browsers. A journey of discovery.

  • To Hell With Bad Browsers

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    In a year or two, all sites will be designed with standards that separate structure from presentation (or they will be built with Flash 7). We can watch our skills grow obsolete, or start learning standards-based techniques. In fact, since the latest versions of IE, Navigator, and Opera already support many web standards, if we are willing to let go of the notion that backward compatibility is a virtue, we can stop making excuses and start using these standards now. At ALA, beginning with Issue No. 99, we’ve done just that. Join us.

  • This HTML Kills: Thoughts on Web Accessibility

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    Activist Jim Byrne sounds off on the importance of web accessibility, and the difficulty of doing it right.