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Topic: Business

  • Writing Content that Works for a Living

    by Erin Kissane · Issue 271 ·

    Most web copy is still being written by people who aren't writers and don't have time. The good news? Anyone who touches copy can make a difference by insisting that every chunk of text on the site do something concrete.

  • Working From Home: The Readers Respond

    by Our Gentle Readers · Issue 270 ·

    We asked. Our gentle readers answered. In A List Apart No. 263 we inquired how you walk the blurry line when you work from home. Here are your secrets—how to balance work and family, maintain energy and focus, get things done, and above all, how to remember the love.

  • Where Our Standards Went Wrong

    by Ethan Marcotte · Issue 233 ·

    To validate or not to validate; that is the question. A List Apart's own Ethan Marcotte helps us to re-examine our approach to standards advocacy and how we can better educate our clients on the benefits of web standards.

  • The Survey, 2008

    by ALA Staff · Issue 264 ·

    Calling all designers, developers, information architects, project managers, writers, editors, marketers, and everyone else who makes websites. It is time once again to pool our information so as to begin sketching a true picture of the way our profession is practiced worldwide.

  • How Do You Walk the Line Between Work and Home? Share Your Best Practices With ALA

    by ALA Staff · Issue 263 ·

    Tell us how you overcome isolation, distractions, and temptation. How you deal with kids and deadlines. How you walk the blurry line between work and home. Share your best practices on working from home so we can present them in an upcoming issue of A List Apart.

  • Walking the Line When You Work from Home

    by Natalie Jost · Issue 263 ·

    Working from home as a freelance contractor or remote employee can be a great thing, particularly if you live alone. But what if you have a spouse and/or children at home with you while you work? Every work environment offers distractions, but those who work from home with their families face a unique set of issues—and need equally unique ways of dealing with them.

  • Collaborate and Connect with Subversion

    by Ryan Irelan · Issue 262 ·

    Managing subcontractors and distributed projects is easy and fun. No wait, that's a lie. Luckily, a good version control may be just what you need to keep your projects on track.

  • Why Did You Hire Me?

    by Keith LaFerriere · Issue 259 ·

    Landing a new job or client is difficult in this economic climate. Undelivered contractual promises and work environment shortcomings can transform that challenge into a long-term nightmare. Keith LaFerriere shows how to get paid what you're worth; how to fight for control of your projects using management tools corporate cultures respect (even if they don't understand your work); and how to tell when it's time to jump ship.

  • The Cure for Content-Delay Syndrome

    by Pepi Ronalds · Issue 259 ·

    Clients love to write copy. Well, they love to plan to write it, anyhow. On most web design projects, content is the last thing to be considered (and almost always the last thing to be delivered). We’ll spend hours, weeks, even months, doing user scenarios, site maps, wireframes, designs, schemas, and specifications—but content? It’s a disrespected line item in a schedule: “final content delivered.” Pepi Ronalds proposes a solution to this constant cause of project delays.

  • The Long Hallway

    by Jonathan Follett · Issue 236 ·

    In the virtual conference room, no one can hear you scream. Social networking enables knowledge workers like us to build virtual companies with no office space and little overhead. But can we make them succeed? Follett dissects the skills required to create, manage, and grow the virtual firm.

  • The Rules of Digital Engagement

    by Jonathan Follett · Issue 252 ·

    Jonathan Follett takes another trip down the long hallway, looking at ways to collaborate, communicate, and manage conflict in virtual space.

  • Get Out from Behind the Curtain

    by Sarah B. Nelson · Issue 245 ·

    Client input: positive process or creative noose? Many designers would probably say the latter. But it needn't be that way. Adaptive Path's Sarah Nelson shows how to create collaborative work sessions that take the clients' needs in hand while leaving creative control in yours.

  • Design by Metaphor

    by Jack Zeal · Issue 243 ·

    Sometimes the best way to understand a client's needs is by comparing their project to an existing site or service. The site should feel "like eBay" and work "like Expedia." But what do such comparisons really mean? Learn to master the metaphor while avoiding unrealistic goals and expectations.

  • Educate Your Stakeholders!

    by Shane Diffily · Issue 237 ·

    Who decides what's best for a website? Highly skilled professionals who work with the site's users and serve as their advocates? Or schmucks with money? Most often, it's the latter. That's why a web designer's first job is to educate the people who hold the purse strings.

  • Stand and Deliver

    by David Sleight · Issue 237 ·

    You've got thirty seconds to sell your work to the well dressed nemesis who's paying you. Handle the next few moments gracefully, and the project will be one you can be proud of. Flub an answer, and you can kiss excellence goodbye. Are you prepared? Can you deliver?

  • When You Are Your Own Client, Who Are You Going To Make Fun Of At The Bar?

    by Jim Coudal · Issue 201 ·

    Should your blog have a business? Jim Coudal shares insights into the adventure of transitioning from client services to product creation.

  • Web 3.0

    by Jeffrey Zeldman · Issue 210 ·

    Web 2.0 is a fresh-faced starlet on the intertwingled longtail to the disruptive experience of tomorrow. Web 3.0 thinks you are so 2005.

  • Never Get Involved in a Land War in Asia (or Build a Website for No Reason)

    by Greg Storey · Issue 205 ·

    If you don't know what the website you're working on is supposed to _do_, it's going to be really hard to succeed. Greg Storey offers a simple web strategy development process for everyone.

  • The Four-Day Week Challenge

    by Ryan Carson · Issue 216 ·

    Constantly stressed out? Not enough hours in the day to get things done? Ryan Carson has a theory: your problem is too much work time, not too little.

  • Web Designer and Proud of It

    by Chris MacGregor · Issue 100 ·

    Professional web designers do not “do” web page design, we practice it. Web design is not a merit badge to be added to your uniform in scouts (but the way things are going it is probably not far off), it is a career choice that demands continual growth and serious dedication. We continually work at improving our skills and techniques, learning how to use new tools and mastering the old ones. To elevate our profession from the perception it has now to the esteem that it deserves, the gap between the professional and the amateur should be evident to the casual viewer.

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