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Topic: Content

Content strategy for desktop, mobile, and beyond. Copy as interface. Building trust through better writing and honest communication. Working with, and in some cases building your own, content management systems. Designing for readers. Web narratives and design as content. Crafting content-focused digital products and brands.

  • Responsive Design Won’t Fix Your Content Problem

    by Karen McGrane ·

    For years, we’ve told clients to serve the same content to every platform. We explained that Responsive Web Design allows content to squish itself into any container. Is it any wonder, then, that the belief has slowly grown that RWD can act as a substitute for actual content strategy?

  • Don’t Poke the Bear: Creating Content for Sensitive Situations

    by Kate Kiefer Lee · Issue 377 ·

    Delivering bad news is hard, but it’s part of life and business. We notify customers when we’re out of a product they want to buy, and we send warnings when people violate our companies’ terms of service. God forbid we have to send a system alert because our database was hacked, affecting every one of our users. But these things happen to the best of us. Can you be the bearer of bad news in a way that respects your customers? Learn how to create empathetic content for tricky situations, and shape your internal culture to foster human values of support, respect, and empathy.

  • The Alternative is Nothing

    by Karen McGrane ·

    We’re witnessing one of the latest waves of technological disruption, as mobile devices put access to the internet in the hands of people who previously never had that power.

  • WYSIWTF

    by Karen McGrane ·

    Arguing for “separation of content from presentation” implies a neat division between the two. The reality, of course, is that content and form, structure and style, can never be fully separated. Anyone who’s ever written a document and played around to see the impact of different fonts, heading weights, and whitespace on the way the writing flows knows this is true. Anyone who’s ever squinted at HTML code, trying to parse text from tags, knows it too.

  • Digital Publishing and the Web

    by The W3C ·

    Electronic books are on the rise everywhere. For some this threatens centuries-old traditions; for others it opens up new possibilities in the way we think about information exchange in general, and about books in particular. Hate it or love it: electronic books are with us to stay.

  • Passing On Our Rights

    by David Sleight ·

    Last month, a U.S. District Court handed down a decision that’s pretty awful if you care about consumer rights and digital content.

  • They Keep Using That Word

    by David Sleight ·

    The word "real" gets tossed around a lot when people compare physical objects and digital ones. That's fine for casual conversation, but when publishers use that kind of sloppy language it reveals serious flaws in how they think about their products and businesses.

  • Who Needs Headlines?

    by Shaun Crowley · Issue 238 ·

    A designer formats and places text. Technically, the job ends there. But some designers go further, sharpening their clients' content to grab and focus user attention. In so doing, they create more effective sites—and gain an advantage over other designers. Drawing on decades of copywriter lore, Shaun Crowley discusses seduction by headline and other principles of writing that sells.

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