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Topic: CSS

  • Beyond DOCTYPE: Web Standards, Forward Compatibility, and IE8

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    For seven years, the DOCTYPE switch has stood designers and developers in good stead as a toggle between standards mode and quirks mode. But when IE7, with its greatly improved support for standards, “broke the web,” it revealed the flaw in our toggle. The quest was on to find a more reliable ensurer of forward compatibility. Is version targeting the answer?

  • How to Size Text in CSS

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    It’s a tug-of-war as old as web design. Designers need to control text size and the vertical grid; readers need to be able to resize text. A better best practice for sizing type and controlling line-height is needed; and in this article, Richard Rutter obligingly supplies one.

  • CSS @ Ten: The Next Big Thing

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    Ten years ago, Håkon Wium Lie and Bert Bos gave us typographic control over web pages via CSS. But Verdana and Georgia take us only so far. Now Håkon shows us how to take web design out of the typographic ghetto, by harnessing the power of real TrueType fonts.

  • Conflicting Absolute Positions

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    All right, class. Using CSS, produce a liquid layout that contains a fixed-width, scrolling side panel and a flexible, scrolling main panel. Okay, now do it without JavaScript. By chucking an assumption about how CSS works in browsers, Rob Swan provides the way and means.

  • Frameworks for Designers

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    Frameworks like Rails, Django, jQuery, and the Yahoo User Interface library have improved web developers’ lives by handling routine tasks. The same idea can work for designers. Learn how to harness the power of tools, libraries, conventions, and best practices to focus creative thought and energy on what is unique about each project.

  • How to Grok Web Standards

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    For designers who find web standards as easy to grasp as a buttered eel, Craig Cook shows how to stop the hurting and turn on the understanding. Learn how web standards work, and why they are more than simply an alternative means of producing a visual design.

  • Super-Easy Blendy Backgrounds

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    Gradients: a nutritious part of your Web 2.0 breakfast. Wouldn’t it be swell if you could get all that goodness without opening Photoshop every time you needed a little gradient bliss? Matthew O’Neill explains how you can.

  • 12 Lessons for Those Afraid of CSS and Standards

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    If you’re new to CSS and web standards, you may feel as though you’ve fallen down a rabbit hole. Ben Henick is here to ease your pain.

  • Sliced and Diced Sandbags

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    Wouldn’t it be great if there were a way to get text to flow around an irregularly shaped image? Wouldn’t it be even better if we could automate the process? Have no fear: Rob Swan is here to show us the way.

  • Automatic Magazine Layout

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    You can’t always count on having a professional designer around to resize and position your images for you, but you’d rather your page layout didn’t look like it was created by orangutans. Harvey Kane builds a script that makes your life easier.

  • Prettier Accessible Forms

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    Forms are a pain. You can make them pretty, make them accessible, or go a little crazy trying to achieve both. Nick Rigby offers a happy solution.

  • A More Accessible Map

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    Nifty web maps powered by Google and Yahoo! APIs are all the rage. And rage is what a visually impaired user may feel when trying to use them. Is there a way to make beautiful web maps accessible? In a word, yes.

  • In Search of the Holy Grail

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    Just in case you might want a three-column layout that doesn’t require the usual sacrifices, we thought we’d share this technique. Not that you’d want that or anything.

  • Thinking Outside the Grid

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    CSS has broken the manacles that kept us chained to grid-based design…so why do so few sites deviate from the grid? Molly E. Holzschlag can tell us that the answer has something to do with airplanes, urban planning, and British cab drivers.

  • Printing a Book with CSS: Boom!

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    You like microformats? We’ll give you some freakin’ microformats. CSS luminaries Håkon Wium Lie and Bert Bos introduce the boom! microformat and show you how to make book the easy way.

  • CSS Swag: Multi-Column Lists

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    Multi-column lists: can’t live with ’em, can’t achieve perfect bliss without ’em. Paul Novitski offers a staggering six possible methods for accomplishing this commonly requested layout trick. Examine your options and choose wisely.

  • Introducing the CSS3 Multi-Column Module

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    Cédric Savarese would like you to meet the CSS3 multi-column module. It may not have extensive browser support yet, but this semantically sound method of dividing content into columns may be more relevant than you think.

  • ALA’s New Print Styles

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    Print away, you fiends! Eric Meyer presents the ALA 4.0 print styles and discusses the challenge of translating a complex screen layout into a well-designed and useful printed page.

  • Improving Link Display for Print

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    Some time ago, Eric Meyer showed you how to add URIs to the printed version of your pages using print styles. Sometimes, though, too many inline URIs can make pages hard to read. Aaron Gustafson comes to the rescue with a JavaScript add-on that’ll have you loving your linkage again.

  • High-Resolution Image Printing

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    Your client looks up and says, “Why does our logo look funny when we print the pages?” Do you sigh dramatically, or learn about Ross Howard’s technique for printing high-resolution images via CSS? We vote for option B.