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Topic: CSS

  • In Search of the Holy Grail

    by Matthew Levine · Issue 211 ·

    Just in case you might want a three-column layout that doesn't require the usual sacrifices, we thought we'd share this technique. Not that you'd want that or anything.

  • Improving Link Display for Print

    by Aaron Gustafson · Issue 203 ·

    Some time ago, Eric Meyer showed you how to add URIs to the printed version of your pages using print styles. Sometimes, though, too many inline URIs can make pages hard to read. Aaron Gustafson comes to the rescue with a JavaScript add-on that'll have you loving your linkage again.

  • CSS Swag: Multi-Column Lists

    by Paul Novitski · Issue 204 ·

    Multi-column lists: can't live with ’em, can't achieve perfect bliss without ’em. Paul Novitski offers a staggering six possible methods for accomplishing this commonly requested layout trick. Examine your options and choose wisely.

  • A More Accessible Map

    by Seth Duffey · Issue 215 ·

    Nifty web maps powered by Google and Yahoo! APIs are all the rage. And rage is what a visually impaired user may feel when trying to use them. Is there a way to make beautiful web maps accessible? In a word, yes.

  • ALA’s New Print Styles

    by Eric Meyer · Issue 203 ·

    Print away, you fiends! Eric Meyer presents the ALA 4.0 print styles and discusses the challenge of translating a complex screen layout into a well-designed and useful printed page.

  • Automatic Magazine Layout

    by Harvey Kane · Issue 219 ·

    You can't always count on having a professional designer around to resize and position your images for you, but you'd rather your page layout didn't look like it was created by orangutans. Harvey Kane builds a script that makes your life easier.

  • DOM Design Tricks

    by J. David Eisenberg · Issue 68 ·

    In Part One of a spankin’ new series, Eisenberg shows you, step by step, how to use the W3C Document Object Model (DOM), Style Sheets, and JavaScript to pull off nifty design tricks and add value to your site's content.

  • DOM Design Tricks III: Using Events in the Document Object Model

    by J. David Eisenberg · Issue 75 ·

    Be a code wizard ... or, just look like one. In Part 3 of the DOM Design Tricks tutorial series,Eisenberg shows us how to dynamically change text on a page. The theory, examples, and scripts will work in Mozilla and IE5.

  • Mountaintop Corners

    by Dan Cederholm · Issue 179 ·

    Most of us have experience creating “rounded” corners by erasing pixels. It’s a rudimentary web design technique — or so we always thought. But in the hands of Dan Cederholm, author of Web Standards Solutions, this seemingly simple technique paves the way for boxes and borders that can change sizes and colors at your whim.

  • DOM Design Tricks II

    by J. David Eisenberg · Issue 73 ·

    Part 2 of this exclusive ALA series shows how to use the DOM’s events and nodes to create nifty interactive menus and more. Design cool stuff while learning about emerging standards.

  • Pocket-Sized Design: Taking Your Website to the Small Screen

    by Jorunn D. Newth, Elika Etemad · Issue 187 ·

    Among the many websites that are out there, few are standards-compliant. Among those few, only a handful sport style sheets adjusted to the needs of handheld devices. Of those which do offer styling for handhelds, not all will fit the smallest, lowest-resolution screens without presenting the user with the ultimate handheld horror: namely, horizontal scrolling. This article presents a set of general suggestions for creating a handheld-friendly style sheet that works well even on handheld screens no wider than 120px.

  • Thinking Outside the Grid

    by Molly E. Holzschlag · Issue 209 ·

    CSS has broken the manacles that kept us chained to grid-based design...so why do so few sites deviate from the grid? Molly E. Holzschlag can tell us that the answer has something to do with airplanes, urban planning, and British cab drivers.

  • CSS Sprites: Image Slicing’s Kiss of Death

    by Dave Shea · Issue 173 ·

    Say goodbye to old-school slicing and dicing when creating image maps, buttons, and navigation menus. Instead, say hello to a deceptively simple yet powerful sprite-based CSS solution.

  • Night of the Image Map

    by Stuart Robertson · Issue 166 ·

    CSS design from beyond the grave: all the secret ingredients you’ll need to resurrect the image map using CSS and structurally sensible XHTML.

  • CSS Design: Taming Lists

    by Mark Newhouse · Issue 151 ·

    Do you crave the disciplined order of proper (X)HTML lists but long for control over their presentation? You can put a stop to their wild ways and bad behavior. Mark Newhouse shows you how to tame those lists by making them submit to your CSS while maintaining logical HTML structure.

  • CSS Design: Going to Print

    by Eric Meyer · Issue 144 ·

    Say no to “printer-friendly” versions and yes to printer-specific style sheets. CSS expert Eric Meyer shows how to conceive and design print style sheets that automatically format web content for off-screen delivery. Includes tips on hiding inappropriate content, styling text for the printer, and displaying the URL of every link on the page.

  • High-Resolution Image Printing

    by Ross Howard · Issue 202 ·

    Your client looks up and says, "Why does our logo look funny when we print the pages?" Do you sigh dramatically, or learn about Ross Howard's technique for printing high-resolution images via CSS? We vote for option B.

  • The Way It’s Supposed to Work

    by Erin Kissane · Issue 192 ·

    Groundbreaking accessibility information. Project management and information architecture theory from old-school experts. Plug-and-play solutions to universal design and development problems. Experimental CSS/DOM hacks that use non-semantic elements to do funky design tricks. One of these things is not like the others...which is why we’re introducing a tiny new feature to the magazine.

  • Accesskeys: Unlocking Hidden Navigation

    by Stuart Robertson · Issue 158 ·

    Your favorite applications have shortcut keys. So can your site, thanks to the XHTML accesskey attribute. Accesskeys make sites more accessible for people who cannot use a mouse. Unfortunately, almost no designer uses accesskeys, because, unless they View Source, most visitors can’t tell that you’ve put these nifty navigational shortcuts to work on your site. In this issue, Stuart Robertson unlocks the secret of providing visible accesskey shortcuts.

  • Cross-Column Pull-Outs

    by Daniel M. Frommelt · Issue 190 ·

    Print designers like to wrap text around images that sit between columns. Now you can, too. Daniel Frommelt takes us where no web layout has gone before.

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