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Topic: HTML

  • A More Useful 404

    by Dean Frickey · Issue 272 ·

    When broken links frustrate your site's visitors, a typical 404 page explains what went wrong and provides links that may relate to the visitor's quest. That's good, but now you can do better. With Dean Frickey's custom 404, when something's amiss, pertinent information is sent not only to the visitor, but to the developer—so that, in many cases, the problem can be fixed! A better 404 means never having to say you're sorry.

  • Progressive Enhancement with JavaScript

    by Aaron Gustafson · Issue 271 ·

    Our introductory series on progressive enhancement and the ways it can be implemented concludes with a look at the mindset needed to implement PE in JavaScript, and a survey of best practices for doing so.

  • Progressive Enhancement with CSS

    by Aaron Gustafson · Issue 270 ·

    Organize multiple style sheets to simplify the creation of environmentally appropriate visual experiences. Support older browsers while keeping your CSS hack-free. Use generated content to provide visual enhancements, and seize the power of advanced selectors to create wondrous (or amusing) effects. Part two of a series.

  • Understanding Progressive Enhancement

    by Aaron Gustafson · Issue 269 ·

    Steven Champeon turned web development upside down, and created an instant best practice of standards-based design, when he introduced the notion of designing for content and experience instead of browsers. In part one of a series, ALA’s Gustafson refreshes us on the principles of progressive enhancement. Upcoming installments will translate the philosophy into sophisticated, future-focused design and code.

  • Where Our Standards Went Wrong

    by Ethan Marcotte · Issue 233 ·

    To validate or not to validate; that is the question. A List Apart's own Ethan Marcotte helps us to re-examine our approach to standards advocacy and how we can better educate our clients on the benefits of web standards.

  • CSS Sprites2 - It’s JavaScript Time

    by Dave Shea · Issue 266 ·

    In 2004, Dave Shea took the CSS rollover where it had never gone before. Now he takes it further still—with a little help from jQuery. Say hello to hover animations that respond to a user's behavior in ways standards-based sites never could before.

  • Multi-Column Layouts Climb Out of the Box

    by Alan Pearce · Issue 232 ·

    “Holy Grail,” “One True Layout,” “pain in the @$$”... Alan Pearce presents a cleaner approach to designing multi-column layouts.

  • Faux Absolute Positioning

    by Eric Sol · Issue 261 ·

    CSS layout is awesome, except when your layout calls for a header, a footer, and columns in between. Use float, and content changes can cause columns to wrap. Use absolute positioning, and your footer can crash into your columns. Add the complexity of drag-and-drop layouts, and a new technique is needed. Enter "faux absolute positioning." Align every item to a predefined position on the grid (as with absolute positioning), but objects will still affect the normal flow (as with float).

  • Fix Your Site With the Right DOCTYPE!

    by Jeffrey Zeldman · Issue 142 ·

    You’ve done everything right, but your site is breaking in the latest browsers. A faulty DOCTYPE is likely to blame. This essential ALA article will provide you with DOCTYPEs that work, enabling you to fix your site with just one tag.

  • Zebra Tables

    by David F. Miller · Issue 173 ·

    While misused tables are becoming increasingly rare, the table retains a legitimate role in data formatting. A little CSS and JavaScript magic can make tables better at what they do best: displaying tabular data.

  • A Preview of HTML 5

    by Lachlan Hunt · Issue 250 ·

    Who's afraid of HTML 5? Not Lachlan Hunt! As both a front-end web developer and a contributor to HTML 5, he tells us what we can expect from the emerging markup specification, whose goals include more flexibility and greater interoperability.

  • Better Living Through XHTML

    by Jeffrey Zeldman · Issue 137 ·

    Everything you wanted to know about converting from HTML to XHTML, including why you’d want to, tools that help, changes in the way browsers display XHTML pages, shortcuts, bugs, workarounds, and other tips you won’t find elsewhere.

  • They Shoot Browsers, Don’t They?

    by Jeremy Keith · Issue 253 ·

    Version targeting will allow Microsoft to reach new heights of standards compliance where CSS and (especially) scripting are concerned. But to benefit from it, developers must explicitly opt in. That’s just not right, says Jeremy Keith. And it’s doomed to fail, because standardistas, by their very nature, will refuse to opt in.

  • Version Targeting: Threat or Menace?

    by Jeffrey Zeldman · Issue 253 ·

    Version targeting shakes our browser-agnostic faith. Its default behavior runs counter to our expectations, and seems wrong. Yet to offer true DOM support without bringing JScript-authored sites to their knees, version targeting must work the way Microsoft proposes, argues Jeffrey Zeldman.

  • Keeping Your Elements’ Kids in Line with Offspring

    by Alex Bischoff · Issue 252 ·

    Alex Bischoff introduces Offspring, a JavaScript library bringing the power of advanced CSS selectors to browsers that can’t quite handle the real thing.

  • From Switches to Targets: A Standardista’s Journey

    by Eric Meyer · Issue 251 ·

    Grab your galoshes and walking stick and follow along with A List Apart's Eric Meyer as he considers the vices and virtues of version targeting as a standards toggle.

  • Beyond DOCTYPE: Web Standards, Forward Compatibility, and IE8

    by Aaron Gustafson · Issue 251 ·

    For seven years, the DOCTYPE switch has stood designers and developers in good stead as a toggle between standards mode and quirks mode. But when IE7, with its greatly improved support for standards, "broke the web," it revealed the flaw in our toggle. The quest was on to find a more reliable ensurer of forward compatibility. Is version targeting the answer?

  • The Trouble With EM ’n EN (and Other Shady Characters)

    by Peter K Sheerin · Issue 124 ·

    More than you ever wanted to know about dashes, spaces, curly quotes, and other vagaries of online typography. HTML specs, grammatical rules, browser bugs and character encoding—it’s all here, in this famous and much-bookmarked ALA article.

  • How to Size Text in CSS

    by Richard Rutter · Issue 249 ·

    It's a tug-of-war as old as web design. Designers need to control text size and the vertical grid; readers need to be able to resize text. A better best practice for sizing type and controlling line-height is needed; and in this article, Richard Rutter obligingly supplies one.

  • Conflicting Absolute Positions

    by Rob Swan · Issue 241 ·

    All right, class. Using CSS, produce a liquid layout that contains a fixed-width, scrolling side panel and a flexible, scrolling main panel. Okay, now do it without JavaScript. By chucking an assumption about how CSS works in browsers, Rob Swan provides the way and means.

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