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Topic: HTML

  • Automatic Magazine Layout

    by Harvey Kane · Issue 219 ·

    You can't always count on having a professional designer around to resize and position your images for you, but you'd rather your page layout didn't look like it was created by orangutans. Harvey Kane builds a script that makes your life easier.

  • DOM Design Tricks

    by J. David Eisenberg · Issue 68 ·

    In Part One of a spankin’ new series, Eisenberg shows you, step by step, how to use the W3C Document Object Model (DOM), Style Sheets, and JavaScript to pull off nifty design tricks and add value to your site's content.

  • DOM Design Tricks III: Using Events in the Document Object Model

    by J. David Eisenberg · Issue 75 ·

    Be a code wizard ... or, just look like one. In Part 3 of the DOM Design Tricks tutorial series,Eisenberg shows us how to dynamically change text on a page. The theory, examples, and scripts will work in Mozilla and IE5.

  • DOM Design Tricks II

    by J. David Eisenberg · Issue 73 ·

    Part 2 of this exclusive ALA series shows how to use the DOM’s events and nodes to create nifty interactive menus and more. Design cool stuff while learning about emerging standards.

  • Win the SPAM Arms Race

    by Dan Benjamin · Issue 145 ·

    SPAM is evil, moronic, and pervasive, but help is on the way. All it takes is a bit of JavaScript, a smidgen of PHP, and the ten minutes it takes to read this short, sweet tutorial. Reduce dreck mail with Dan Benjamin’s easy-to-implement address encoder.

  • High Accessibility Is Effective Search Engine Optimization

    by Andy Hagans · Issue 207 ·

    It's no coincidence that search engines love highly accessible websites; in fact, by designing for accessibility, you're already using effective search-engine optimization techniques. Andy Hagans explains yet another reason to pay attention to accessibility.

  • CSS Sprites: Image Slicing’s Kiss of Death

    by Dave Shea · Issue 173 ·

    Say goodbye to old-school slicing and dicing when creating image maps, buttons, and navigation menus. Instead, say hello to a deceptively simple yet powerful sprite-based CSS solution.

  • Night of the Image Map

    by Stuart Robertson · Issue 166 ·

    CSS design from beyond the grave: all the secret ingredients you’ll need to resurrect the image map using CSS and structurally sensible XHTML.

  • CSS Design: Taming Lists

    by Mark Newhouse · Issue 151 ·

    Do you crave the disciplined order of proper (X)HTML lists but long for control over their presentation? You can put a stop to their wild ways and bad behavior. Mark Newhouse shows you how to tame those lists by making them submit to your CSS while maintaining logical HTML structure.

  • High-Resolution Image Printing

    by Ross Howard · Issue 202 ·

    Your client looks up and says, "Why does our logo look funny when we print the pages?" Do you sigh dramatically, or learn about Ross Howard's technique for printing high-resolution images via CSS? We vote for option B.

  • The Way It’s Supposed to Work

    by Erin Kissane · Issue 192 ·

    Groundbreaking accessibility information. Project management and information architecture theory from old-school experts. Plug-and-play solutions to universal design and development problems. Experimental CSS/DOM hacks that use non-semantic elements to do funky design tricks. One of these things is not like the others...which is why we’re introducing a tiny new feature to the magazine.

  • What the Hell is XML?

    by Troy Janisch · Issue 132 ·

    Attention, content managers, developers, site owners and designers: XML is here, and the time to start using it is now.

  • Accesskeys: Unlocking Hidden Navigation

    by Stuart Robertson · Issue 158 ·

    Your favorite applications have shortcut keys. So can your site, thanks to the XHTML accesskey attribute. Accesskeys make sites more accessible for people who cannot use a mouse. Unfortunately, almost no designer uses accesskeys, because, unless they View Source, most visitors can’t tell that you’ve put these nifty navigational shortcuts to work on your site. In this issue, Stuart Robertson unlocks the secret of providing visible accesskey shortcuts.

  • Validating a Custom DTD

    by J. David Eisenberg · Issue 194 ·

    In his article in this issue, Peter-Paul Koch proposes adding custom attributes to form elements to allow triggers for specialized behaviors. The W3C validator won’t validate a document with these attributes, as they aren’t part of the XHTML specification. Not to worry! This article will show you how to create a custom DTD that will add those custom attributes, and will also show you how to validate documents that use those new attributes.

  • More About Custom DTDs

    by The W3C QA Group · Issue 199 ·

    Your web page uses non-standard elements, so, following the advice of earlier ALA articles, you bang out a custom DTD to make sure your document still validates. Not so fast, says the W3C’s Quality Assurance team, who argue that crafting a custom DTD for the sole purpose of validation is a mistake … and then tell when it is the right thing to do.

  • Spruced-Up Site Maps

    by Kim Siever · Issue 197 ·

    The clean-n-simple site map gets a nice haircut and and a shoe-shine as Kim Siever shows us how to hook custom bullet styles to troublesome nested lists.

  • Sliding Doors of CSS

    by Douglas Bowman · Issue 160 ·

    Image-driven, visually compelling user interfaces. Text-based, semantic markup. Now you can have both! Douglas Bowman’s sliding doors method of CSS design offers sophisticated graphics that squash and stretch while delivering meaningful XHTML text. Have your cake and eat it, too!

  • A Standards-Compliant Publishing Tool for the Rest of Us?

    by Jeffrey Zeldman · Issue 157 ·

    Publishing with web standards is not for experts alone. A new tool hopes to make it easier for anyone. ALA interviews Six Apart’s Anil Dash about his company’s easy-to-use, standards-compliant publishing tool, TypePad.

  • How to Read W3C Specs

    by J. David Eisenberg · Issue 121 ·

    Although they appear maddeningly incomprehensible at first, W3C specifications are actually great sources of information, once you understand their secrets. Learn how to read the specs.

  • Alternative Style: Working With Alternate Style Sheets

    by Paul Sowden · Issue 126 ·

    Build a standards-compliant Style switcher: After explaining the basics of alternate style sheets, Sowden shows how to make them work in IE, Mozilla, and other modern browsers with just a few lines of JavaScript. Use style switchers to make your site more accessible, to facilitate user customization, or to develop creative effects.

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