A List Apart

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Topic: Industry

  • Information vs. Experience

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    The conflict between presentation and structure reveals two views of the web. Which one’s winning?

  • Global Treaty Could Transform the Web

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    Mahoney is boiling mad over a proposed global treaty that would turn our worldwide web into a mishmash of regional Intranets, each attending to whatever local regulation allows.

  • Down By Law

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    A U.S. law scheduled to take effect on the 20th of this month will force libraries and schools to censor Internet access or lose their funding. If enacted, the law will restrict free speech and punish the poorest of the poor. Librarian and web developer Carrie Bickner explores the politics of censorship and the digital divide.

  • Patents, Royalties, and Web Standards

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    This week there is only one web story that matters. The W3C has written a patent policy that opens the door to royalty payments on web standards.

  • Rolling the Start-up Dice (A Survival Guide)

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    So you want to work for an Internet start-up company. Bruce and Moyer show you the ropes.

  • “Forgiving” Browsers Considered Harmful

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    By hiding the need for structure that the web will require as it moves toward XHTML and XML, “forgiving” web browsers have helped breed a world of structural markup illiterates. Eisenberg examines the damage done.

  • CSS Talking Points: Selling Clients on Web Standards

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    Selling your clients on standards-compliant design doesn’t have to hurt. Kise’s four-point CSS Selling Plan helps the medicine go down.

  • Nipping Client Silliness in the Bud

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    Slashdot’s Robin (Roblimo) Miller could write a book about web clients’ mistakes. In fact, he’s writing it now – but he needs your help.

  • A Failure to Communicate

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    It’s ironic that, as professionals dedicated to clear communication, information architects and user interface designers are having such trouble communicating with each other. Information designer George Olsen digs up the roots of communication breakdown and explores the three aspects of web design.

  • The Client Did It: A WWW Whodunit

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    Shepherd on the fine art of telling bad clients to buzz off.

  • Much Ado About Smart Tags

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    Microsoft’s proprietary Smart Tags: Boon or bane? Kaminski digs deep beneath the hype and paranoia in an extensive assessment of what Microsoft hath wrought.

  • All the Access Money Can Buy

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    Just when you think online multimedia will never be truly access, someone proves you wrong. In BMW Films, Clark sees a tantalizing glimpse of a better web.

  • Experience Design

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    It’s time for web designers to peek over the cubicle and start sharing ideas with their peers in related design disciplines. Jacobson suggests one way to do that in this overview of the emerging Experience Design paradigm.

  • The Road to Dystopia

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    Now that greed, pride, and stupidity have wrecked the web economy, how’s a semi-idealistic web developer supposed to make a living? Chris Kaminski hitches a ride down the road to dystopia.

  • This HTML Kills: Thoughts on Web Accessibility

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    Activist Jim Byrne sounds off on the importance of web accessibility, and the difficulty of doing it right.

  • One Boy’s Life: Surviving the Dotcom Blitz

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    A boy, a job, and a floundering economy. Nick Finck tells his personal story of hirings and firings on the cusp of the dotcom crunch.

  • Survivor! (How Your Peers are Coping With the Dotcom Crisis)

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    It’s ugly out there, but how bad is it, really? We asked 40 colleagues to share how they were coping (or not) with the layoffs and business failures plaguing our industry.

  • Time to Close the Web?

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    Focusing on presentation at the expense of content, and invasive money-making schemes at the expense of everything else, designers must take some of the blame for the trashing of the web. Herrell wonders if it’s time to call it a day and close up shop.

  • Dr. Strangeglobe: Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love The W3C.

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    Can the mysterious Dr Strangeglobe save the WWWorld from a conspiracy to contaminate our precious liquid layouts? Erika Meyer takes a non-standard look at the W3C in this charming yet educational spoof of the Kubrick classic.

  • Why Are You Here?

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    Whether we’re designing experimental sites or keeping an online diary, we go to the web in search of meaning. Will we find it? Or will we build it ourselves?