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Topic: JavaScript

  • Web 3.0

    by Jeffrey Zeldman · Issue 210 ·

    Web 2.0 is a fresh-faced starlet on the intertwingled longtail to the disruptive experience of tomorrow. Web 3.0 thinks you are so 2005.

  • Introducing the CSS3 Multi-Column Module

    by Cédric Savarese · Issue 204 ·

    Cédric Savarese would like you to meet the CSS3 multi-column module. It may not have extensive browser support yet, but this semantically sound method of dividing content into columns may be more relevant than you think.

  • Improving Link Display for Print

    by Aaron Gustafson · Issue 203 ·

    Some time ago, Eric Meyer showed you how to add URIs to the printed version of your pages using print styles. Sometimes, though, too many inline URIs can make pages hard to read. Aaron Gustafson comes to the rescue with a JavaScript add-on that'll have you loving your linkage again.

  • Getting Started with Ajax

    by Aaron Gustafson · Issue 213 ·

    In this excerpt from O'Reilly's Web Design in a Nutshell, 3rd Edition, ALA's production editor would like to take you aside for a little chat about the birds and the bees. Or maybe about Ajax.

  • Community Creators, Secure Your Code! Part II

    by Niklas Bivald · Issue 217 ·

    In part two of his two-part series on protecting your community site from malicious cross-site scripting attacks, Niklas Bivald rolls up his trousers and wades into the JavaScript.

  • A More Accessible Map

    by Seth Duffey · Issue 215 ·

    Nifty web maps powered by Google and Yahoo! APIs are all the rage. And rage is what a visually impaired user may feel when trying to use them. Is there a way to make beautiful web maps accessible? In a word, yes.

  • Community Creators, Secure Your Code!

    by Niklas Bivald · Issue 215 ·

    Don't be like MySpace. Protect your community site from malicious cross-site scripting attacks. Part one of a two-part series.

  • DOM Design Tricks

    by J. David Eisenberg · Issue 68 ·

    In Part One of a spankin’ new series, Eisenberg shows you, step by step, how to use the W3C Document Object Model (DOM), Style Sheets, and JavaScript to pull off nifty design tricks and add value to your site's content.

  • DOM Design Tricks III: Using Events in the Document Object Model

    by J. David Eisenberg · Issue 75 ·

    Be a code wizard ... or, just look like one. In Part 3 of the DOM Design Tricks tutorial series,Eisenberg shows us how to dynamically change text on a page. The theory, examples, and scripts will work in Mozilla and IE5.

  • Behavioral Separation

    by Jeremy Keith · Issue 218 ·

    Breaking up is hard to do. But in web design, separation can be a good thing. As Jeremy Keith explains, content, style, and behavior all deserve their own space.

  • DOM Design Tricks II

    by J. David Eisenberg · Issue 73 ·

    Part 2 of this exclusive ALA series shows how to use the DOM’s events and nodes to create nifty interactive menus and more. Design cool stuff while learning about emerging standards.

  • A Better Image Rotator

    by Dan Benjamin · Issue 186 ·

    The first image rotator made it easy to generate a random image on a web page, even if you had never worked with PHP before. The new, more powerful (but still dead easy) version uses a simple configuration file to create custom links, alt tags, titles, and even CSS styles for each image. Plus it handles differently sized images without a hiccup. Enjoy!

  • Win the SPAM Arms Race

    by Dan Benjamin · Issue 145 ·

    SPAM is evil, moronic, and pervasive, but help is on the way. All it takes is a bit of JavaScript, a smidgen of PHP, and the ten minutes it takes to read this short, sweet tutorial. Reduce dreck mail with Dan Benjamin’s easy-to-implement address encoder.

  • The Way It’s Supposed to Work

    by Erin Kissane · Issue 192 ·

    Groundbreaking accessibility information. Project management and information architecture theory from old-school experts. Plug-and-play solutions to universal design and development problems. Experimental CSS/DOM hacks that use non-semantic elements to do funky design tricks. One of these things is not like the others...which is why we’re introducing a tiny new feature to the magazine.

  • JavaScript Logging

    by David F. Miller · Issue 202 ·

    Debugging got you down? Weep no more. David F. Miller introduces fvlogger, a script library that brings simple logging functionality to JavaScript and the browser and makes your life easier and more fun.

  • Enhance Usability by Highlighting Search Terms

    by Matt Riggott, Brian Suda · Issue 186 ·

    Google’s cache offers users a copy of your website with their search terms highlighted. You can do the same thing and make it easier for users to find what they’re looking for — whether they're coming from an external search engine or your own site search — by making their search terms easy to spot.

  • Hybrid CSS Dropdowns

    by Eric Shepherd · Issue 197 ·

    Yup. It’s yet another CSS dropdown article — but one that resolves many problems associated with common dropdown methods and degrades beautifully. Hybrid CSS dropdowns allow access to all pages, keep the user aware of where she is within the site, and are clean and light to boot. It’s a tasty little vitamin pill, so quit sighing and try it.

  • JavaScript Triggers

    by Peter-Paul Koch · Issue 194 ·

    Now that you’ve separated your website’s (XHTML) structure from its (CSS) presentation, wouldn’t it be great to similarly abstract the behavioral (JavaScript) layer from the others? ALA prodigal Peter-Paul Koch shows how to use JavaScript Triggers to do just that.

  • Complex Dynamic Lists: Your Order Please

    by Christian Heilmann · Issue 200 ·

    Help your site’s visitors reach their goals quickly with a dynamic menu that takes its cue from the Mac OS X Finder.

  • Alternative Style: Working With Alternate Style Sheets

    by Paul Sowden · Issue 126 ·

    Build a standards-compliant Style switcher: After explaining the basics of alternate style sheets, Sowden shows how to make them work in IE, Mozilla, and other modern browsers with just a few lines of JavaScript. Use style switchers to make your site more accessible, to facilitate user customization, or to develop creative effects.

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