A List Apart

Menu

Topic: Project Management

  • Avoid Edge Cases by Designing Up Front

    ·

    By the time they reach the coding stage, many web projects are a tangle of exceptions—and that can make standards-based development a nightmare. Better planning may be exactly what you need to avoid markup derangement or, even worse, a dysfunctional product.

  • In Defense of Difficult Clients

    ·

    Challenging clients: avoidable pain or necessary stepping stone to enlightenment? Rob Swan considers the benefits of un-perfect clients.

  • Designing Through the Storm

    ·

    As designers, we all face the inevitable slump. That point where our creativity stagnates and we find ourselves at a dead end. Walter Stevenson offers suggestions on staying productive and creative.

  • I Wonder What This Button Does

    ·

    We’ve all lost work to file overwrites and other minor disasters. There are remedies — and as Mike West explains, you don’t have to have awe-inspiring technical skills to take advantage of them.

  • The Four-Day Week Challenge

    ·

    Constantly stressed out? Not enough hours in the day to get things done? Ryan Carson has a theory: your problem is too much work time, not too little.

  • Never Get Involved in a Land War in Asia (or Build a Website for No Reason)

    ·

    If you don’t know what the website you’re working on is supposed to _do_, it’s going to be really hard to succeed. Greg Storey offers a simple web strategy development process for everyone.

  • Use Cases Part II: Taming Scope

    ·

    The use-case model can be a powerful tool for controlling scope throughout a project’s life cycle. Because a simplified use-case model can be understood by all project participants, it can also serve as a framework for ongoing collaboration and a visual map of all agreed-upon functionality. Use it to plan, to negotiate, and to prevent scope creep.

  • Separation: The Web Designer’s Dilemma

    ·

    Presentation separated from structure. Structure separated from content. The foot bone connected to the ... what were we talking about? Michael Cohen steps in to examine our assumptions and relieve our separation anxiety.

  • The Problem, the Balloon, and the Four Bedroom House

    ·

    Without a problem, there is no project. Where there is a problem, however, there is a stakeholder who is desperate for a solution and who has a delivery deadline — which is normally sometime yesterday. Find out how a good process can tame even the most unruly project.

  • Tackling Usability Gotchas in Large-scale Site Redesigns

    ·

    Redesigns can solve old usability problems while creating new ones that must be solved in turn. From the lessons of the ALA 3.0 redesign comes this quick study in remapping content without frustrating readers.

  • A Standards-Compliant Publishing Tool for the Rest of Us?

    ·

    Publishing with web standards is not for experts alone. A new tool hopes to make it easier for anyone. ALA interviews Six Apart’s Anil Dash about his company’s easy-to-use, standards-compliant publishing tool, TypePad.

  • In Defense of Scope Creep

    ·

    Scope creep seems inevitable. Our attempts to gather our clients’ requirements early on often seems a futile effort. Scope creep distorts our carefully structured schedules, making project managers weep.  Have we run out of strategies for fighting this evil scourge? Is it hopeless? Maybe not. Maybe, thinks Hal Helms, it can even be beneficial.

  • Time Management: The Pickle Jar Theory

    ·

    Time management theories come and go, and we’re glad when most of them leave. But this one caught our fancy. No charts, no grids, no five-syllable words, just a simple idea that can help you get more done with less stress. New ALA contributing writer Jeremy Wright uncorks the Pickle Jar Theory of Time Management.

  • CMS and the Single Web Designer

    ·

    Content Management Systems free designers from the gruntwork of individual web page production. They may also free companies from the need to retain design staff. How do content management systems work, and what impact will they have on a web designer’s job?

  • Process, Methodology, Life Cycle, Oh My!

    ·

    Process, methodology, life cycle. No matter what label you slap on it, if you want to manage your web projects, you need a system that works the way you do. Meryl K. Evans’s overview will help you kick-start your own process.

  • The Client Did It: A WWW Whodunit

    ·

    Shepherd on the fine art of telling bad clients to buzz off.

  • Cheaper Over Better: Why Web Clients Settle for Less

    ·

    Schumacher investigates why clients hire bad web designers — and what good web designers can do about it.

  • Nipping Client Silliness in the Bud

    ·

    Slashdot’s Robin (Roblimo) Miller could write a book about web clients’ mistakes. In fact, he’s writing it now – but he needs your help.

  • CSS Talking Points: Selling Clients on Web Standards

    ·

    Selling your clients on standards-compliant design doesn’t have to hurt. Kise’s four-point CSS Selling Plan helps the medicine go down.

  • Back to Basics

    ·

    The importance of being Source.