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Topic: State of the Web

  • Findings From the Web Design Survey

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    In April 2007, A List Apart and An Event Apart conducted a survey of people who make websites. Close to 33,000 web professionals answered the survey’s 37 questions, providing the first data ever collected on the business of web design and development as practiced in the U.S. and worldwide. Working with statisticians, we spent the next months crunching raw data into meaningful findings. Here we present what we have learned about our powerful yet little-studied profession.

  • The Web Design Survey, 2007

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    People who make websites have been at it for more than a dozen years, yet almost nothing is known, statistically, about our profession. Let’s do something to change that. Presenting A List Apart’s first annual Web Design Survey.

  • The Long Hallway

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    In the virtual conference room, no one can hear you scream. Social networking enables knowledge workers like us to build virtual companies with no office space and little overhead. But can we make them succeed? Follett dissects the skills required to create, manage, and grow the virtual firm.

  • Version Targeting: Threat or Menace?

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    Version targeting shakes our browser-agnostic faith. Its default behavior runs counter to our expectations, and seems wrong. Yet to offer true DOM support without bringing JScript-authored sites to their knees, version targeting must work the way Microsoft proposes, argues Jeffrey Zeldman.

  • The Rules of Digital Engagement

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    Jonathan Follett takes another trip down the long hallway, looking at ways to collaborate, communicate, and manage conflict in virtual space.

  • From Switches to Targets: A Standardista’s Journey

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    Grab your galoshes and walking stick and follow along with A List Apart’s Eric Meyer as he considers the vices and virtues of version targeting as a standards toggle.

  • Evangelizing Outside the Box: Web Standards and Large Companies

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    Contrary to popular belief, designers and developers at many big companies use web standards in their work every day. They just don’t talk about it. For standards awareness to reach the next level, they’ll have to start talking, says PPK.

  • Valentines to the Web

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    You love it! You really love it. ALA’s readers tell us who gets their candy hearts this year.

  • Valentine’s Day Massacre

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    From buzzword-happy marketers to snobby standards gurus, from AJAX to Zope, ALA’s gentle readers tell us what they bloody well hate about the web.

  • Thinking Outside the Grid

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    CSS has broken the manacles that kept us chained to grid-based design…so why do so few sites deviate from the grid? Molly E. Holzschlag can tell us that the answer has something to do with airplanes, urban planning, and British cab drivers.

  • A Fairy, a Low-Fat Bagel, and a Sack of Hammers

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    Never underestimate the importance of words on the web.

  • Why Don’t You Code for Netscape?

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    Long considered the Holy Grail of web design, “backward compatibility” has its place; but at this point in web development history, shouldn’t we be more concerned about forward compatibility? ALA makes the case for authoring to web standards instead of browser quirks.

  • Information vs. Experience

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    The conflict between presentation and structure reveals two views of the web. Which one’s winning?

  • The Devil His Due: What Online Porn Portends

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    It’s a dirty job, but someone’s gotta do it: Jacobson studies “adult” sites to see what they can tell us about the future of web content. His predictions are not pretty.

  • Circle Jerks & Web Elitists

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    The web design community goes through this kind of self-examination every three months. Under the banner of honest criticism, names are named, guesses about motivation are sketched, and sometimes entire bodies of work are dismissed.

  • Beyond Usability and Design: The Narrative Web

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    Crafting a narrative web: To succeed profoundly, Bernstein says, websites must go beyond usability and design, deeply engaging readers by turning their journeys through the site into rich, memorable, narrative experiences.

  • The Declination of Independence

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    Three web designers discuss trendiness and innovation in design, and list 15 sites that made a difference in the year 2000.

  • How to be Soopa Famous

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    Become a famous web designer. Or ... just look like one.

  • To Hell With Bad Browsers

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    In a year or two, all sites will be designed with standards that separate structure from presentation (or they will be built with Flash 7). We can watch our skills grow obsolete, or start learning standards-based techniques. In fact, since the latest versions of IE, Navigator, and Opera already support many web standards, if we are willing to let go of the notion that backward compatibility is a virtue, we can stop making excuses and start using these standards now. At ALA, beginning with Issue No. 99, we’ve done just that. Join us.

  • The Web is Like Canada

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    Those who “get” the web create it. Those who do not get the web are put in charge. Joe Clark presents a vision for defending our web against their worst ideas.