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  • Priority Guides: A Content-First Alternative to Wireframes

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    The sirens’ song of wireframe visuals has been the thorn in the side of many a design project. With potential to undermine user-centricity, reduce team engagement, and limit creativity when it’s most needed, wireframes can bite the unwary. In this article, Heleen van Nues and Lennart Overkamp discuss an alternative that’s far more in tune with today’s content-first, responsive design ethos, whether used as a direct replacement or to help tame wireframes’ wilder side early in a project’s life.

  • The Illusion of Control in Web Design

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    We think of our job as controlling the user’s experience. But the reality is, we control far less than we imagine. And that’s by design: it’s how the web, and the networks that serve it, are supposed to work. ALA’s Aaron Gustafson shows the many ways our medium conspires to break our carefully crafted experiences, and shares solid advice on what we can do about it.

  • Working with External User Researchers: Part II

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    Most people agree that it’s important to get feedback from users, but in reality, not everyone can afford a dedicated user researcher on their team. In this second and final installment on working with external user researchers, we focus on how to get things done once you’ve found the right person to bring onto your project. With these best practices around on-boarding and collaboration, you’ll be able to get the most value for your money, and get the most candid insights into what your users really think.

  • Going Offline

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    With all modern browsers now supporting Service Workers, it’s important to take a look at how we can use this tool to improve our users’ experiences online (and off). Jeremy Keith provides a gentle, in-depth introduction in this excerpt from Chapter 1 of his new book, Going Offline.

  • Planning for Everything

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    Time taken to reflect, whether in the shower or conference room, gives us opportunities to learn from our successes and our failures. Peter Morville emphasizes the importance of reflecting in this excerpt from Chapter 7 of his new book, Planning for Everything.

  • Meeting Design

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    Good meetings stick with you and ultimately lead to better outcomes. Find out how to make your meetings more memorable in this excerpt from Kevin Hoffman’s new book: Meeting Design.

  • Designing for Research

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    Image quality may be about striking the balance between speed and quality, but there’s more to it than meets the eye. What if, despite having methods to develop better and better image experiences for the web, the user disagrees? In a quest to find answers, Jeremy Wagner takes us through an image quality study that he designs, develops, and iterates on with user feedback. Asking “Why?” is no easy undertaking in research. His lossy is your gain.

  • Conversational Design

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    Engaging with users in a meaningful dialogue can seem daunting. Scary even. Understanding how to do it well will pay great dividends because UX is heading in that direction. Find out more in this excerpt from Erika Hall’s latest book, Conversational Design.

  • A DIY Web Accessibility Blueprint

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    Good accessibility is good UX. We should seek to create the best user experience for all (not just the able-bodied). But launching a company accessibility remediation project can be a big undertaking. You will need to win over company leadership, build a multi-disciplinary accessibility team, and educate everyone on accessibility standards. In this article, Beth Raduenzel provides a step-by-step guide to making and maintaining an accessible website.

  • We Write CSS Like We Did in the 90s, and Yes, It’s Silly

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    The tools web developers use to build websites have changed dramatically since the 1990s. But when it comes to the craft of writing CSS, Jens Meiert argues, it often seems that we haven’t learned anything over the past 20 years. Meiert discusses why that is and offers his thoughts on how spending more time thinking about the basics can bring the writing of CSS into the 21st century.