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  • Write What You Know (Now)

    · · 24 Comments

    We talk ourselves out of writing (or at least out of publishing) in all kinds of ways: It states the obvious. There’s no conclusion. No one will read it. Someone might read it! Well, so what? You never know how much that seemingly insignificant story of yours may be appreciated in the future—it could be one of a handful of search hits on an obscure issue; it could be a reminder of how you used to work 15 years ago; it could help people get to know you better; and best of all, it can definitely help you gain confidence in communicating. So give yourself permission to write what you know so far, because you’re the only one stopping you.

  • It’s the People They Know

    · · 9 Comments

    Chance can play such a vital part in your career. You may be unexpectedly exposed to technology that becomes central to how you make a living. People you meet who seem to have nothing to do with your work, or who were potential clients or colleagues that didn’t pan out, can end up connecting you to someone who turns out to be central to the next phase of your career.

  • Looking for Love: Standing Out from the Crowd of Web Job Seekers

    · · 5 Comments

    You have a solid resume, but can’t seem to connect with the right job. Maybe it's not you. Jeffrey Zeldman suggests reconsidering your career niche or refocusing your work persona. It could open fresh hiring tracks just waiting for the right candidate—you.

  • Balancing the Scale

    · · 1 Comment

    The culture of a business is closely tied to its size. A small crew with little overhead has flexibility in choosing clients. A big firm offers extensive resources and coworker interaction. Your startup’s character will change as it progresses through these levels too. Knowing what effects come into play during company growth can help you choose the work environment where you’re most comfortable and fulfilled, or give you the ability to control the growth of your own business so you can bring it in at a size that works best for you. In the final part of a four-part series on the money side of the web, Matt Griffin describes the ages and stages of company growth.

  • Singapore, a Hub for Designers?

    · · 5 Comments

    A city with dazzling diversity and a global outlook, Singapore has always been a genial entry point for first-time visitors to Asia. Now the city-state is shaping itself into a center where startups and creative thinking can thrive. Antoine Lefeuvre has traveled there several times. Here he shares his impressions and what he has heard from residents—native Singaporeans and expats—about the business climate transition.

  • Offering Feedback

    · · 9 Comments

    If you only interact with users when they need support or have a feature request, you’re only interacting with the minority of your customers. The ones who don’t reach out to you may be creating their own workarounds to a problem you’d love to hear about, or they may have a use case that would lead to a brilliant feature. Are you guilty of the same developer shyness? Do you build things to enhance a tool or service for your own use, and assume the developer is too busy to want to hear about it? Don’t wait until there’s a need for support: ask your happy customers what they do with your product, and tell developers how you’re using their product.

  • Groups of Five

    · · 1 Comment

    Technology rests on a discovery of patterns: of behavior, association, energy, thinking. How valuable those patterns are to us is constantly being renegotiated as we experience a series of reveal shots that show us another part of the big picture, and yet another part of the big picture, and so on. To rely on a favorite cliché, it’s turtles all the way down.

  • The Analog Revolution

    · · 6 Comments

    Back in the day, when software was released (on physical media), it was considered done. In the present, some products could benefit from a limitation like that. To tie development to something immutable, such as a physical thing or a hard deadline, might just foster a sense of responsibility to design our product so it has what it takes to last a few years.

  • How Do We Get It Done, Now?

    · · 6 Comments

    In the future that’s forever one short year away, brilliantly functional, widely implemented APIs will redeem us from our toil and trouble. We just have to get ready for their coming, while seeing to the nitty-gritty of making the web work in the present. Sadly, it's a lot less predictable than that. Every new standard has to start small, and we’ll always need to choose which API to back and which to pass over.

  • The Nearly-Headless CMS

    · · 12 Comments

    Decoupling your CMS can broaden your options for the presentation layer, let team members narrow their focus to what each does best, or provide data for iOS and Android applications along with a responsive site. Maybe the greatest benefit is that having to consider the relationship between the CMS and rendering layer helps break up assumptions about delivery formats, making you more future-friendly along the way. Mark Llobrera shares a couple of tales where headless was the right solution.

Recent Blog posts

Career Consultation with Dr. Web—Live

Your career is alive, complex, and trying to grow in the right direction—but finding that path can be confusing. When you don’t know what you don’t know, or need just a nudge to kickstart your next step, a healthy dose of guidance can do the trick. In a live Q&A this December, Jeffrey Zeldman brings “Ask Dr. Web” to ALA events, answering viewer questions in real time with cohost Sarah Parmenter.

URLs Beyond the Web

As the newest operating systems for Android and iOS enable deep-linking directly into third-party apps, Anthony Colangelo sees an expanding definition of “the web” and an opportunity to better serve our users.

It’s Time We #FEDtalk

One person focuses on HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Another writes JavaScript tests all day. And they both have the same job title: front-end developer. Mat Marquis talks about why that’s okay, and introduces our latest event, “The State of Front-End Dev”.