Comments on Accessibility Whack-A-Mole

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  1. I would like to add that justified text is also problematic for many, not just those with dyslexia. This would slot under the ‘Space’ heading in the ‘Anyone can do it’ section.

    FWIW, I collected some research into typefaces designed specifically for users with dyslexia and overall found that they offer little to no benefit.

    As such, the approach outlined here (tweak an existing typeface, test) feels like a better approach that can benefit more users.

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  2. I’m curious as to which mediums would most benefit from tackling these types of accessibility challenges? Obviously readership based sites, news, media, blogs ,etc. But what about photo and video heavily content? For example, I built a design gallery for a pool company and while there are many things I need to do to make it more mobile friendly, I wonder how big of a priority font accessible is in comparison to improving the visual experience.

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  3. @richardwilson, for video-heavy sites it matters in how you present closed captions and/or transcripts. For photo-heavy sites it matters for photo captions. Arguably typeface accessibility is not an either/or with improving the visual experience, it is integral to improving the visual experience.

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  4. Makes sense Adrian, thank you.

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  5. This whole topic infuriates me. I build websites for businesses where artistic design is very important. In fact it is how I get business. If I have to “dumb down” my designs so that a screen reader or whatever is used for the impaired, it can drastically change the way something looks and/or the amount of time it takes to create. I understand it is a design challenge, but most small businesses cant afford to pay for this. I can appreciate the fact that certain measures need to be in place to accommodate those who unfortunately have deal with their injury/disability.

    But where do we draw the line?

    There are a lot of scum bag lawyers taking advantage of these laws and are actively going after small businesses that are “not in compliance” I can understand requiring a business to put in a ramp for wheelchairs, but the rest of these laws are B.S. Something like a website is TOO SUBJECTIVE. Who should be sued? the person building the website, or the technology/devices that help the impaired? In my opinion, the tech needs to be improved. Either way, nobody should be sued over it. I feel like its like suing a museum because a blind person cant understand a painting or suing a newspaper company because its not in braille.

    Lawyers are taking advantage of this and it is complete B.S.
    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/60-minutes-americans-with-disabilities-act-lawsuits-anderson-cooper/

    I feel for those who have a disability, but a line has to be drawn somewhere.

     

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  6. @theshae, you are equating two things that are different. This article talks about users who can see and therefore would benefit from a typeface that is clearer. While some may use a screen reader for additional help, that is not the point of this piece. The follow-on benefits are better overall typography and layout, which makes for a more readable site for all users. I also get the sense nobody mandated the author do this work.

    The other thing you are citing is a CBS report that is outside the scope of this article. Regardless, I encourage you to read these two responses, one of them by someone who was interviewed for the piece but was cut: “60 Minutes Slams ADA, Boosts Trump Agenda” and “Anderson Cooper: What Were You Thinking?

    If you would like to learn more or discuss your frustration, ping me on Twitter. I am happy to listen and maybe point you to some resources that can help. I understand how it can appear to be quite a task but you may be surprised how easily (and inexpensively) it can be done.

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  7. I would like to add that justified text is also problematic for many, not just those with dyslexia.

    Amen, brother.

     

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  8. Very interesting i just want to say thank you ! emily from http://fr.viadeo.com/fr/company/piscine-cop

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  9. Loved this article, especially since choosing typefaces are definitely one of my weak points—and lately, so is reading past about 8pm. (Yay turning 40!)

    I hadn’t realized that the ligatures (did I get that one right?) could be part of the problem.

    I know the small-A-big-A pattern for changing text size has been around for a while. Has anyone experimented with providing a font menu for users to choose from? Is it better to provide override instructions? I’m thinking convincing my dad to use the override instructions would be harder than getting him to try a menu, and would remove some of the friction from the interaction. (Sorry Dad.)

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  10. Thanks for writing this post. In China most of developers always make equivalence between accessibility and the blind. However web accessibility means much more.

    Could you please authorize Chinese translation to me? I do want to translate it into Chinese to let more developers know that. The translated post will be post on my blog and of course with the original link.

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  11. Very enlightening article. Interesting how a dyslexic person perceives font shapes.

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