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Topic: Browsers

  • CSS Sprites: Image Slicing’s Kiss of Death

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    Say goodbye to old-school slicing and dicing when creating image maps, buttons, and navigation menus. Instead, say hello to a deceptively simple yet powerful sprite-based CSS solution.

  • CSS Drop Shadows

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    Much used, oft maligned but always popular, drop shadows are a staple of graphic design. Although easy to accomplish with image-editing software, they’re not of much use in the fast-changing world of web design … until now.

  • Designing for Context with CSS

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    The medium is the message: Imagine providing unique information exclusively for people who read your site via a web-enabled cell phone — then crafting a different message for those who are reading a printout instead of the screen. Let your context guide your content. All it takes is some user-centric marketing savvy and a dash of CSS.

  • Retooling Slashdot with Web Standards Part II

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    In Part I, we showed how Slashdot could save money and reduce bandwidth requirements by converting to semantic XHTML markup and CSS layout. In Part II, we explore how standards-compliant markup and deft use of CSS could make Slashdot and your sites play nicely in print and on handheld devices.

  • Retooling Slashdot with Web Standards

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    A look at the markup behind Slashdot.org demonstrates how simple and cost-effective the switch to a standards-compliant Slashdot could be. (Part I of a two-part series.)

  • Suckerfish Dropdowns

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    Teach your smart little menus to do the DHTML dropdown dance without sacrificing semantics, accessibility, or standards compliance or writing clunky code.

  • Facts and Opinion About Fahrner Image Replacement

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    Fahrner Image Replacement and its analogues aim to combine the benefits of high design with the requirements of accessibility. But how well do these methods really work? Accessibility expert Joe Clark digs up much-needed empirical data on how FIR works (and doesn’t) in leading screen readers.

  • Accesskeys: Unlocking Hidden Navigation

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    Your favorite applications have shortcut keys. So can your site, thanks to the XHTML accesskey attribute. Accesskeys make sites more accessible for people who cannot use a mouse. Unfortunately, almost no designer uses accesskeys, because, unless they View Source, most visitors can’t tell that you’ve put these nifty navigational shortcuts to work on your site. In this issue, Stuart Robertson unlocks the secret of providing visible accesskey shortcuts.

  • Cross-Browser Variable Opacity with PNG: A Real Solution

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    Think you’re stuck with wimpy GIFs and their rigid binary transparency? Well, think again, Sunshine. Michael Lovitt shows how to overcome flaky browser support for PNG so you can take advantage of this graphic format’s lossless compression, alpha transparency, and variable opacity.

  • Flash MX: Clarifying the Concept

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    In a detailed survey, accessibility obsessive Joe Clark evaluates Flash MX (authoring tool and player) in the context of the often confusing WAI and Section 508 guidelines, finds some things to cheer about, and draws a roadmap for future improvements.

  • Build a Cross-Platform Testing Station in Mac OS

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    Everybody talks about cross-platform testing, but nobody’s shown how to do it on a nuts-and-bolts level. Until now. Sciortino’s comprehensive tutorial for Mac-based web designers will set you up with the testing platform of your dreams.

  • Better Living Through XHTML

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    Everything you wanted to know about converting from HTML to XHTML, including why you’d want to, tools that help, changes in the way browsers display XHTML pages, shortcuts, bugs, workarounds, and other tips you won’t find elsewhere.

  • What the Hell is XML?

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    Attention, content managers, developers, site owners and designers: XML is here, and the time to start using it is now.

  • Omniweb and Standards

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    Omniweb, a promising new browser for Mac OS X, has been much praised for its elegant interface and beautiful antialiasing of text. But how does it fare with web standards like CSS and the DOM? To find out, Waferbaby puts newly released version 4.1b1 through the paces.

  • Mac Browser Roundup (with Håkon Lie and Tantek Çelik)

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    We test drove and reviewed the new Mac browsers, then asked browser makers Håkon Lie of Opera and Tantek Çelik of Microsoft to respond to our comments.

  • Why Don’t You Code for Netscape?

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    Long considered the Holy Grail of web design, “backward compatibility” has its place; but at this point in web development history, shouldn’t we be more concerned about forward compatibility? ALA makes the case for authoring to web standards instead of browser quirks.

  • MSN, Opera, and Web Standards

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    Håkon Lie, the father of Style Sheets and CTO of Opera, debunks Microsoft’s claim that web standards have anything to do with the blocking of Opera and Mozilla users from MSN.com.  Lie’s eye–opening commentary includes a chart analyzing all 63 top–level pages at MSN.com in terms of standards compliance.

  • Much Ado About Smart Tags

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    Microsoft’s proprietary Smart Tags: Boon or bane? Kaminski digs deep beneath the hype and paranoia in an extensive assessment of what Microsoft hath wrought.

  • CSS Design: Size Matters

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    Everything you think you know about controlling text sizes on the web is either wrong, or else it doesn’t work. In this much-bookmarked ALA classic, UI designer and CSS Todd Fahrner provides a way out of the mess by showing how to make CSS font size keywords work – even in stubborn browsers that get CSS wrong.

  • “Forgiving” Browsers Considered Harmful

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    By hiding the need for structure that the web will require as it moves toward XHTML and XML, “forgiving” web browsers have helped breed a world of structural markup illiterates. Eisenberg examines the damage done.