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Topic: Business

When you are your own client, who are you going to make fun of at the bar? The designer as entrepreneur. In defense of client services. Accessibility and the law. Web 2.0 is a fresh-faced starlet on the intertwingled longtail to the disruptive experience of tomorrow. Cheaper over better: why web clients settle for less. It ain't easy getting green: why are freelancers the last to be paid? Revenue and other models.

  • The Right Way to Select Technology, An Excerpt

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    Using the same methods UX designers use to build great products can actually improve the process of selecting technology for the enterprise. Tony Byrne and Jarrod Gingras help you capture requirements that don’t suck in this excerpt of Chapter 4 of their new book, The Right Way to Select Technology, available now from Rosenfeld Media.

  • Considering Open Source Licenses

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    Open source projects promise to speed your product delivery with virtually no cost. But different licenses for projects can impact your own work in significant ways. Phillip Ikuvbogie wants to help you learn the differences between popular open source licenses and how you can incorporate open source projects effectively.

  • Conducting the Technical Interview

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    Hiring for technical roles can be unnerving. Does your interview plan cover the vital questions? Have you clearly defined the role? Will you recognize the right candidate? Brandon Gregory shares experiences and tips to help you make the right hiring decision.

  • Widen Out: Using Your Blog to Attract New Clients

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    A weblog’s ability to attract client work is one of its most overlooked benefits. JustReachOut’s Dmitry Dragilev shares some simple ideas on how to create content that generates real interest in our work.

  • Long-Term Design: Rewriting the Design Sales Pitch

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    Hyping the latest, greatest, flashiest design options may be fun and attention-grabbing, but it doesn’t always serve your bottom line. Author Jarrod Drysdale says instead of constantly pitching new products to new customers, consider standing behind your original great designs and pitch ongoing support and design evolution to your existing clients.

  • Guerrilla Innovation

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    If you don’t work at a place like Google or 3M—companies celebrated for rewarding innovation—don’t despair. You can still push new ideas through, see them gain traction, and watch your company evolve for the better. You just need to be smart about your tactics. Janice Gervais has some advice on how to practice effective guerrilla innovation.

  • The Imbalance of Culture Fit

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    Part of getting to a better place in the new year is recognizing where we have sway, and going past our own discomfort to create positive change in ourselves and in the world. Those of us who have a role in the hiring process can do better by thinking critically about culture fit. Matt Griffin challenges us to consider whether it actually creates the kind of team that’s the best for the enterprise, or mostly serves to make us comfortable by surrounding us with people largely like ourselves in ways that aren’t relevant to the business.

  • Demystifying Public Speaking

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    We’re an industry of ideas—ideas that feed our interests and enhance our work. Each perspective is a potential catalyst for growth. In this excerpt from Demystifying Public Speaking, Lara Hogan tells us why and how to give public speaking a try.

  • The Coming Revolution in Email Design

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    Email isn’t just evolving—it’s staging a coup. More and more designers are coming up with exciting new ways of bringing effects like animation and interactivity to the humble inbox. Crucially, for the first time, email client vendors like Microsoft and Google are listening to concerns voiced by email professionals. The web is leaking into the inbox, writes Jason Rodriguez. Don’t get left behind.

  • Help! We (Think We) Need to Hire a Content Strategist

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    Managers beginning active searches for content specialists frequently have little understanding of what their companies need beyond a title, cautions Jennifer Bassett. Hiring managers at agencies, brands, and startups would do well to hire based on the type of work they want to focus on. And if they’re not sure what type of work that is, talking with a real live content strategist is an excellent place to start.

  • Once Upon a Time

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    To communicate like a grown-up, take a lesson from your inner child. Anne Gibson argues that business interactions could benefit from fairy-tale constructions—start at the beginning, get to the point, and don’t forget to tie up loose ends.

  • It’s the People They Know

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    Chance can play such a vital part in your career. You may be unexpectedly exposed to technology that becomes central to how you make a living. People you meet who seem to have nothing to do with your work, or who were potential clients or colleagues that didn’t pan out, can end up connecting you to someone who turns out to be central to the next phase of your career.

  • Looking for Love: Standing Out from the Crowd of Web Job Seekers

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    You have a solid resume, but can’t seem to connect with the right job. Maybe it’s not you. Jeffrey Zeldman suggests reconsidering your career niche or refocusing your work persona. It could open fresh hiring tracks just waiting for the right candidate—you.

  • Balancing the Scale

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    The culture of a business is closely tied to its size. A small crew with little overhead has flexibility in choosing clients. A big firm offers extensive resources and coworker interaction. Your startup’s character will change as it progresses through these levels too. Knowing what effects come into play during company growth can help you choose the work environment where you’re most comfortable and fulfilled, or give you the ability to control the growth of your own business so you can bring it in at a size that works best for you. In the final part of a four-part series on the money side of the web, Matt Griffin describes the ages and stages of company growth.

  • Singapore, a Hub for Designers?

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    A city with dazzling diversity and a global outlook, Singapore has always been a genial entry point for first-time visitors to Asia. Now the city-state is shaping itself into a center where startups and creative thinking can thrive. Antoine Lefeuvre has traveled there several times. Here he shares his impressions and what he has heard from residents—native Singaporeans and expats—about the business climate transition.

  • Choosing a CMS Your Organization Will Love

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    That never-ending search for the perfect CMS—maybe we’re using the wrong criteria. Too frequently, we approach CMS selection with cost or functionality as our bottom line, leading to solutions that look good, but struggle to adapt to the internal workflow. But finding a tool that matches organizational requirements means shifting focus. Artas Bartas presents three ways of approaching the CMS selection process with your team’s needs and processes top of mind.

  • If Ever I Should Leave You: Job Hunting For Web Designers and Developers

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    At the start of your career, you’re excited to have any job—but at some point you wonder if there’s a better job out there for you. Is it youthful restlessness, or are you learning to recognize the warning signs of career stagnation? There’s no sure-fire way to tell—but if you’ve stopped growing or feeling any passion for the work, it’s probably time to let go. So how do you find a better job without making it worse with your current colleagues and in your bank account? Jeffrey Zeldman has some tried-and-true tips to make your transitions smoother.

  • Software Audits for the Tiny Business

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    Routine software audits sound like just about the most boring thing in the world. But losing access to a DNS server, missing important alerts from a developer, or paying for a forgotten service are adventures nobody needs. Often, a contractor or an employee sets up an account or buys software for company use. When that person moves to another role, important license or login information can get lost in the shuffle. Rachel Andrew wants you to love the drab old software audit. It’s your best ally for preventing nasty surprises.

  • The Art of Creating Accurate Estimates

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    If you make a living in client services, you know how daunting the estimating process can be. Somehow, you have to predict how much time and work will go into completing a client’s project before it even begins. Clients have to trust your estimates in order to commit funds to a project. You have to trust your estimates in order to commit to the next project on your schedule. Matt Griffin shares some tips to make estimating a bit more methodical and a bit less fraught.

  • Resetting Agency Culture

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    When we prioritize billable hours over people, our work environments can take a turn for the tense. Some agencies try to combat low morale with foosball and fancy perks, but what really matters is investing in people: fostering a workplace that supports dialogue, collaboration, and professional development. From onboarding new hires to ongoing engagement, Justin Dauer shares some starting points for a healthy office dynamic and confident, happy employees.