Planning for Everything

Time taken to reflect, whether in the shower or conference room, gives us opportunities to learn from our successes and our failures. Peter Morville emphasizes the importance of reflecting in this excerpt from Chapter 7 of his new book, Planning for Everything.

Meeting Design

Good meetings stick with you and ultimately lead to better outcomes. Find out how to make your meetings more memorable in this excerpt from Kevin Hoffman’s new book: Meeting Design.

Feedback That Gives Focus

As creative professionals, we might see ourselves as the hero of our work’s story. But this can make feedback—an inevitable part of our work—seem like the villain. Learn how to reframe your relationship to your biggest nemesis. Make feedback your trusted sidekick instead.

Project Management for Humans

Staffing teams can feel a bit like a game of Tetris, but don’t forget your teams are human beings. They have interests, strengths, and qualities that should be considered above their availability.

Team Conflict: Four Ways to Deflate the Discord that’s Killing Your Team

Interpersonal relationships and team dynamics can be tricky. We often eschew the values of team work and working together, but balancing relationships when everyone has a good idea is tough. Jessica Hall shares some thoughts on how to navigate those tricky spots so your team can start communicating and get back to what they do best.

Managing Ego

Any of us can be that irrational colleague who makes for an interesting day at work. All it takes is low confidence and high anxiety—and that comes with the territory. Brandon Gregory shows us how we can bolster and validate our coworkers and strengthen our own emotional resilience so we can avoid unnecessary drama and produce happier relationships.

Insisting on Core Development Principles

The expectations for our work have matured significantly over the last couple of decades. If this overwhelms those of us who build the web day in and day out, imagine how our clients must feel. And yet time and again, we fail our clients by offloading too much responsibility for the development process onto them. We need to build best practices into our workflows from the start, Kendra Skeene reminds us—not wait for our clients to request specific core practices.

Promoting a Design System Across Your Products

Our industry has gotten really good at making living style guides out of parts: reusable components like color, typography, buttons and forms, voice and tone. We’ve also learned how to map skills to these parts by mobilizing the best people to make decisions across platforms. But, argues Nathan Curtis, a third element is crucial to any design system mission: products. What products will use our system? How will we involve them?

Aligning Content Work with Agile Processes

Times (and job titles, and platforms) have changed. Agile has the potential to liberate content strategists from obsolete ways of working, and developers and designers can help. Brendan Murray identifies four key areas—iteration, product, people, and communication—where designers and devs can find common ground with their content counterparts and usher them into to an agile world. The open and collaborative approach of modern agile development is a framework within which content work can refine itself, test, and learn.

Defeating Workplace Drama with Emotional Intelligence

Workplace drama, coworker and client irrationality: these seem like forces of nature that we have no way to prevent or control. Brandon Gregory shows us the emotional calculus at the heart of the tempest. Try this formula on any behavior that makes no sense, and it will help you understand what’s going on and what you can do to help.