The A List Apart Blog Presents:

Blue Beanie Day 14: Toque ’em if You’ve Got ’em

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On Sunday, November 30, web designers and developers across the globe will celebrate Blue Beanie Day 2014, wearing a blue beanie to show their support for web standards. Join in!

“What’s Blue Beanie Day,” you may ask? Well, it’s possible you’ve seen it in years past: a host of avatars on Twitter and Facebook, with selfies galore, each sporting a little blue toque. Here’s the thing: each is a tribute to the hat that launched a thousand sites: the blue beanie worn by A List Apart’s own Jeffrey Zeldman in that infamous selfie, and that eventually emblazoned the cover of Zeldman’s Designing With Web Standards.

But this isn’t a plug for a book, or for the man wearing the rather fetching hat: rather, sporting a blue chapeau is a reminder that web standards—standards like semantic markup, neatly separated styles, and DOM scripting—are responsible for much of the work we do today. In the pre-WaSP, pre-DWWS world, we were forced to build to the idiosycrasies of each broken desktop browser—could you imagine anything like responsive web design without web standards? It’s true: we face a lot of challenges as the web moves beyond the desktop. But as wild and woolly as this multi-device version of the web is, it’d be significantly more challenging without the solid web standards support we enjoy today.

So if web standards have made your life a little easier—and I know I couldn’t do my job without ’em—then upload a shot of yourself wearing a blue beanie, hat, or cap to any of these fine social media locations:

And there’s no need to wait until November 30: if you’ve got a beanie-enabled shot of yourself, then post away!

3 Reader Comments

  1. Great article!

    Just a note: I found it strange not to see anything about web accessibility in this article. As a designer rather than a coder, accessibility is what resonates most meaningfully for me on Blue Beanie Day!

  2. we were forced to build to the idiosycrasies of each broken desktop browser

    I hate to say it but we’re still in the middle of it, just replace ‘desktop’ with ‘desktop, mobile and tablet’.

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