Color Craft & Counterpoint: A Designer’s Life with Color Vision Deficiency

There’s a common cognitive dissonance about design: that good design can’t come from designers with color vision deficiencies. Much to the contrary, people with CVDs are far more aware of color and usability gaps, and can be invaluable during the design process. Sharing his first hand perspective as a color blind web professional, Noah Glushien discusses his career, living with CVDs, and how to enhance projects.

Building the Woke Web: Web Accessibility, Inclusion & Social Justice

From banking to civil services to education, the internet intersects every part of our lives in a way that was unthinkable 20 years ago. And yet the web remains inaccessible to vast swathes of people, with code issues far from the only roadblock. Olu explores the complexity of true accessibility, and offers a thoughtful approach to building a safer and more welcoming web.

Standards for Writing Accessibly

In this excerpt from Writing Is Designing, Michael J. Metts and Andy Welfle discuss critical accessibility considerations for content authors, including reading order, references to additional content, and instructions.

Getting to the Heart of Digital Accessibility

You’ve heard it before: there is not enough diversity in tech. But Carie Fisher offers one solution you may not have heard: that focusing on accessibility may be key in making the tech world itself more accessible.

Semantics to Screen Readers

As an extension to our From URL to Interactive series, designer and front-end developer Melanie Richards takes a deep dive into how our content is accessed by a wide array of screen readers, which are highly customizable to users. Understanding the nuances of accessibility APIs, thorough testing approaches, and the wealth of resources available, site creators can create the most widely accessible content for the most users possible.

Paint the Picture, Not the Frame: How Browsers Provide Everything Users Need

Designers want to create fully branded experiences, which often results in customized highlighting colors or pixel-perfect typography. While these design touches can enhance the experience for some, they can render the experience inaccessible for others. Designer Eric Bailey makes a case for leaving key accessibility features to the browser to ensure the most accessible experience possible.

Designing for Cognitive Differences

Accessible design is often reduced to adding alt text and avoiding colors imperceptible by colorblindness. While physical differences are an important component of accessible design, cognitive differences are often ignored entirely. Brandon Gregory considers three common types—inattention, anxiety, and depression—and how they impact their users, patterns that trigger those conditions, and how designers can be more conscientious when design for them.

Conversational Semantics

Semantic markup has always mattered, but with voice interfaces rapidly becoming the norm, it now matters more than ever. Aaron Gustafson shows us how simple HTML tags can have a huge impact with voice interfaces.

A DIY Web Accessibility Blueprint

Good accessibility is good UX. We should seek to create the best user experience for all (not just the able-bodied). But launching a company accessibility remediation project can be a big undertaking. You will need to win over company leadership, build a multi-disciplinary accessibility team, and educate everyone on accessibility standards. In this article, Beth Raduenzel provides a step-by-step guide to making and maintaining an accessible website.