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Menu Issue № 278

In Defense of Readers and Filling the Industry Dance-card in Hard Economic Time

In Defense of Readers

by Mandy Brown · 67 Comments

As web designers, we concern ourselves with how users move from page to page, but forget the needs of those whose purpose is to be still. Learn the design techniques that create a mental space for reading. Use typographic signals to help users shift from looking to reading, from skimming along to concentrating. Limit distractions; pay attention to the details that make text readable; and consider chronology by providing transitions for each of the three phases of the online reading experience.

Filling Your Dance Card in Hard Economic Times

by Pepi Ronalds · 18 Comments

In space no one can hear you scream, and in a global economic meltdown, no industry, not even web design, is safe. But as a web designer, your skills and products are suited to ride out hard times, as long as you stay busy. Learn the seven steps to (relative) security in good times or bad: 1. Keep clients happy. 2. Know your goals. 3. Use your initiative wisely. 4. Communicate. 5. Put in a full day's work. 6. Do it right. 7. Find the love.

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