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Issue № 294

Learn what usability testing is and isn't good for; discover the five warning signs of a bad client relationship (and what to do about them).

Getting to No

by Greg Hoy · 38 Comments

A bad client relationship is like a bad marriage without the benefits. To avoid such relationships, or to fix the one you're in, learn the five classic signs of trouble. Recognizing the never-ending contract revisionist, the giant project team, the vanishing boss and other warning signs can help you run successful, angst-free projects.

The Myth of Usability Testing

by Robert Hoekman Jr. · 29 Comments

Usability evaluations are good for many things, but determining a team's priorities is not one of them. The Molich experiment proves a single usability team can't discover all or even most major problems on a site. But usability testing does have value as a shock treatment, trust builder, and part of a triangulation process. Test for the right reasons and achieve a positive outcome.

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