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  • The King vs. Pawn Game of UI Design

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    If you want to improve your UI design skills, try looking at chess. Sounds contrived, maybe, but in Erik Kennedy’s hands, it’s sublime. Marvel and learn as he uses a concept from chess to build a toolkit of UI design strategies covering color, typography, lighting and shadows, and more.

  • Mental Illness in the Web Industry

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    In the midst of a seemingly endless stream of harassment and discrimination exposés throughout the tech industry, A List Apart thinks we should also be talking about mental health. In this article, we feature the stories of five web professionals who were willing to share their struggles in the workplace.

  • Working with External User Researchers: Part I

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    So you need to bring on an external user researcher. How do you start? Authors Chelsey Glasson, Jeff Sauro, and Cory Lebson have run a user research agency, hired external researchers, and worked as freelancers. Via their different perspectives, they provide a solid guide to hiring researchers as contractors. Part I of two articles.

  • No More FAQs: Create Purposeful Information for a More Effective User Experience

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    Putting the right information in the right place to best support user (and company) goals requires carefully targeted content and good information architecture (IA) … and definitely no FAQs! However attractive the FAQ “solution” might seem at times, using it makes information hard to find, access and maintain, and generally hinders task completion. Discussing the limitations of—and alternatives to—FAQs, Lisa Wright is on a mission to banish them forever, or at the very least make them more effective if you have to include them.

  • Why Mutation Can Be Scary

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    Unexpected changes in your JavaScript code can be a real headache. When working with objects, it can be even harder to prevent unintended mutation. Zell Liew shows us some tricks (and libraries) to prevent these unintended changes and ensure stability when working with objects.

  • Discovery on a Budget: Part I

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    “Discovery” is a key phase of design. It’s the starting point, where you define and clarify the problem you’re about to solve. For established or big businesses with dedicated budgets, teams, and customers to interview, the process is straightforward. But what about small companies, startups, and nonprofits that lack these resources? How can lean organizations participate in and benefit from discovery? Meg Dickey-Kurdziolek shows us, in Part I of “Discovery on a Budget.”

  • My Grandfather’s Travel Logs and Other Repetitive Tasks

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    When your design project involves unconventional data, how do you structure that data to make manipulating it less tedious? Daniel Warren faced this question when he decided to create an infographic showcasing the decades of extensive travel his grandfather had documented in handwritten journals. Learn about the JavaScript techniques Warren used to minimize repetitive tasks and give his grandfather’s travel logs a new life.

  • How the Sausage Gets Made: The Hidden Work of Content

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    Making great content is the messy part of our design and development process that we often overlook and underestimate. Through an Emmy award-winning experience, Caroline Roberts shares helpful tools and tips to help you get the whole team on board, improve your process, and make the best content sausage you possibly can.

  • The Best Request Is No Request, Revisited

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    Now that HTTP/2 is enjoying greater ubiquity than ever, it’s especially important to challenge the once unquestionable rule of resource bundling in client side performance. Join Stefan Baumgartner as he walks you through the potential pitfalls and ill effects of bundling in HTTP/2 environments.

  • Faux Grid Tracks

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    The only way to win IS to play. Join Eric Meyer on a journey through the inner workings of CSS Grid as he tests various techniques to build a tic-tac-toe board filled with content. Hearkening back to the early days of CSS and A List Apart, these playful hacks rekindle a spirit of experimentation.