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Jeff Lembeck

Personalizing Git with Aliases

· 3 Comments

Part of getting comfortable with the command line is making it your own. Small customizations, shortcuts, and time saving techniques become second nature once you spend enough time fiddling around in your terminal. Since Git is my Version Control System of choice (due partially to its incredible popularity via GitHub), I like to spend lots of time optimizing my experience there. Read more

  • Routines Aren’t the Enemy

    by Susan Robertson · · 1 Comment

    I recently read Greg Smith’s piece on Bocoup's blog about how they think about time tracking, including all the fascinating data about how your brain works to solve problems. It interested me a lot, since I've been thinking about not just how I track projects, but also how I structure my day as a freelancer.

  • Making Our Events More Inclusive For Those Under 21 (and Also Everyone Else)

    by Anna Debenham · · 16 Comments

    On Saturday, Benjamin Hollway, a 16 year old front-end developer, wrote a post about his recent experiences attending industry events. He’s been coding since he was eight, and earlier this year he was shortlisted for Netmag's Emerging Talent category. Yet none of the people in this category are able to participate fully in the sort of activities most of us take for granted.

  • Shellshock: A Bigger Threat than Heartbleed?

    by Tim Murtaugh · · 2 Comments

    A newly-discovered Linux flaw may be more pervasive, and more dangerous, than last spring’s Heartbleed.

  • It Was Just A Thing

    by Anthony Colangelo ·

    A little less than two months ago, I wrote about the most dangerous word in software development: just. A lot of assumptions hide behind that seemingly harmless word, but there’s another side to it.

  • Getting Started With CSS Audits

    by Susan Robertson · · 1 Comment

    This week I wrote about conducting CSS audits to organize your code, keeping it clean and performant—resulting in faster sites that are easier to maintain. Now that you understand the hows and whys of auditing, let’s take a look at some more resources that will help you maintain your CSS architecture. Here are some I’ve recently discovered and find helpful.

  • Awkward Cousins

    by Anthony Colangelo · · 5 Comments

    As users we switch seamlessly between the web and apps, yet as designers and developers we huddle in separate rooms. Wouldn’t this party be livelier if we mingled?

  • Watch: A New Documentary About Jeffrey Zeldman

    by Sara Wachter-Boettcher · · 10 Comments

    Jeffrey Zeldman has been sharing, educating, and inspiring web designers for 20 years. A new documentary from Lynda.com tells the story.

  • 10 Years Ago in ALA: Pocket Sized Design

    by Ethan Marcotte · · 2 Comments

    The web doesn’t do “age” especially well. Any blog post or design article more than a few years old gets a raised eyebrow—heck, most people I meet haven’t read John Allsopp’s “A Dao of Web Design” or Jeffrey Zeldman’s “To Hell With Bad Browsers,” both as relevant to the web today as when they were first written. Meanwhile, I’ve got books on my shelves older than I am; most of my favorite films came out before I was born; and my iTunes library is riddled with music that’s decades, if not centuries, old.

  • Valediction

    by Jeffrey Zeldman · · 5 Comments

    When I first met Kevin Cornell in the early 2000s, he was employing his illustration talent mainly to draw caricatures of his fellow designers at a small Philadelphia design studio. Even in that rough, dashed-off state, his work floored me. It was as if Charles Addams and my favorite Mad Magazine illustrators from the 1960s had blended their DNA to spawn the perfect artist.

  • My Favorite Kevin Cornell

    by ALA Staff · · 11 Comments

    After 200 issues—yes, two hundred—Kevin Cornell is retiring from his post as A List Apart’s staff illustrator. Tomorrow’s issue will be the last one featuring new illustrations from him.

The Latest Issue

Issue № 405 ·

  • Training the CMS

    by Eileen Webb · 23 Comments

    Launching a site powered by lovingly crafted content models is a joy. But what happens in the weeks that follow, as authors start entering new content into the CMS? If you want to keep your well-structured content intact and on strategy, a training PDF won’t cut it. Let Eileen Webb show you what will: getting editorial guidelines where your authors need them most—in the CMS itself.

  • Collaborative User Testing: Less Bias, Better Research

    by Alla Kholmatova · 8 Comments

    We all want user research that provides reliable guidance for our teams. But bias is tricky—it’s often introduced unknowingly. How can we be sure that the results of guerrilla user research sessions are as impartial as possible? Alla Kholmatova has the answer: getting more collaborative in how we plan, lead, evaluate, and analyze our user research.

Recent Columns

Nishant Kothary on the Human Web

The Politics of Feedback

We’re obsessive about collecting input from a wide range of potential users and stakeholders. But with such an onslaught of feedback, there’s always a risk of having your motivation and faith in humanity sucked right out of you. Sometimes, you just need calm critique from the few people who really get you. So which kind of feedback is best? The answer is both.

Laura Kalbag on Freelance Design

Breaking Stuff

Designers may do CSS, but not JavaScript. Some may do JavaScript, but draw the line at git. Some may be willing to use git with a graphical interface, but not with Terminal. When we get out of our comfort zone, it’s great to have a safety net so we can learn without breaking stuff too badly.